Sunday, April 19, 2015

Women's Health

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Researchers who study hereditary breast and ovarian cancer call it "the Angelina Jolie Effect." They reported a sustained global surge in requests for BRCA genetic testing after the actress wrote about her preventive mastectomy two years ago. Last month, she gave another boost to awareness when she wrote about her recent surgery to remove her ovaries.
In the 1880s, male doctors referred to it as female madness or hysteria. Symptoms ranged from having a strong sexual appetite to moodiness. Treatments ranged from being placed in an asylum to long vacations near the ocean. Some doctors even went as far as assisting their female patients in achieving orgasm.
But stronger bones did not translate into fewer fractures in this elderly, high-risk population
Smoking, use of antidepressants may add to harms
Applying it to the inner lid raises risk of particles getting into eye, possible vision problems
When a blood clot in her brain prevented Jesi Paschen from nursing her second daughter, she turned to what she believed was the next best thing: breast milk from another mother.
Angelina Jolie's decision for surgery might not be right for everyone carrying BRCA mutations
If you’re a woman who exercises, the fear of “bulking up” may have crossed your mind once or twice. Many women find themselves afraid to put on muscle so they shy away from lifting heavy weights or avoid strength training altogether.
But almost half don't have conversation with doctor about potential for future problems
Understanding wrinkles begins with math.
From raisins to fingerprints, and from tree bark to the surface of the brain, wrinkles appear throughout nature. But scientists have struggled to explain how wrinkles form.
Study also finds those with flexible work situations less likely to retire
Study also finds those with flexible work situations less likely to retire
Added bone mass may help delay osteoporosis, study suggests
U.S. health officials outline a healthy meal plan
Psychologist calls for greater support for all victims -- female and male
Low-lying states have rates up to 16 percent versus 6 percent in mountain regions
Low-lying states have rates up to 16 percent versus 6 percent in mountain regions
Federal health officials say the nicotine-based products pose major health threat to kids
Use of chemical-cousin to 'bath salts' appears to be on the rise, experts say
But fewer than 2 percent of teens become regular users, study finds
Researchers say findings show need for regulations, such as mandatory listing of ingredients
But fewer than 2 percent of teens become regular users, study finds
Researchers say findings show need for regulations, such as mandatory listing of ingredients