Wednesday, July 23, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Women's Health

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Study of over 1 million women suggests it could be stand-alone screening method
Women with anxiety disorders may be more likely to have babies who cry excessively.
Expectant moms' use of nicotine-replacement therapy could also spell problems for kids, study suggests
Those who post provocative images considered less attractive, competent by their peers, study finds
Empowerment is a big part of the Vixen workout, a hip-hop dance class with a night club feel that fitness experts say offers a cardio girls' night out to women.
Women will try, and stick to, a weight loss plan if it promises to ease their hot flashes.
Steroids significantly reduce breast tissue and more.
The Stroller Boot Camp, sponsored by the YMCA, is a place where babies are welcome and strollers are used as a piece of exercise equipment, just like yoga mats and resistance bands.
This could benefit babies later in life, researcher suggests
Study found well-nourished, educated women had similarly sized babies, regardless of where they lived
3 D Mammography offers new way to detect cancer
Daily diaries documented snubs, insults and put-downs
For many of us, the long, cold winter challenged our ability to maintain our fitness goals. With warmer weather now upon us, it's time to start thinking about sleeveless shirts, shorts and teeny bikinis.
Slightly higher rate of stillbirths, ectopic pregnancies seen after cesarean delivery, researchers say
Threat of respiratory disease may be up to 30 percent higher, study suggests
Cutting uterus into smaller fragments for minimally invasive removal can disperse undetected malignancy
Study found mothers who were taught stress-reduction skills had less depression, anxiety
Remedies to help fight the pain and itch
That, in turn, may help reduce health ills, such as diabetes and heart disease, researcher says
And women tend to fare worse than men, study finds
Expectant moms' use of nicotine-replacement therapy could also spell problems for kids, study suggests
But too many children and teens remain obese, experts say
Findings suggest genetics play a bigger role than environment in risk of disorder
Study of over 1 million women suggests it could be stand-alone screening method
Study found moms who returned to part-time work were better able to meet their goals
Only 22 percent of those at risk get screened, and researchers think complacency may be why
Researchers found more signs of thickening in neck arteries of these women during mid-life