Wednesday, August 27, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Beat of music can help drive your workout

You´re bundling up for a chilly morning run. Or about to climb on the elliptical for a high-energy workout. What do you reach for first? (istockphoto.com)
You're bundling up for a chilly morning run. Or about to climb on the elliptical for a high-energy workout. What do you reach for first? (istockphoto.com) iStockphoto

You're bundling up for a chilly morning run. Or about to climb on the elliptical for a high-energy workout. What do you reach for first?

Your earbuds, naturally.

Studies have shown that listening to music that fits the cadence of what you're doing - running, cycling, aerobics - makes you work harder.

"The metronome aspect, the synchronization of movement to music, is the most important," says Carl Foster, director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin at Lacrosse.

More coverage
  • Fitness Center Stage at Mobile World Congress
  • Ready. Set. Train: Preparing for a half marathon
  • Synchronizing movement to a beat is nothing new. In Roman galleys, the drumbeat drove the pace of the rowers. "But there is also the distraction and arousal that music brings," Foster says. They both matter.

    If you want to make a workout mix based on tempo - or BPM, for beats per minute - various websites, including www.songbpm.com, can help. Or try www.motiontraxx.com, which offers playlists at a certain BPM for running and cycling as well as other activities. Other sites include www.workoutmusic.com and www.powermusic.com.

    "The beat becomes very important anytime there is repetitive movement," says Deekron "the Fitness DJ" Krikorian, who does fitness playlists for MotionTraxx. - Washington Post

    Latest Videos
    Also on Philly.com:
    Stay Connected