Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Kids' Health

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Six years ago, when her 3-year-old daughter developed a fever and a discharge from her ear, Latasha Anderson took her to the hospital emergency room.
Expert offers tips on lowering chances of episodes, knowing when to worry
National survey finds one in 10 teen boys also experiences dating violence
Study found half had high blood pressure, half had high cholesterol and 15 percent were diabetic
22 percent were from what parents said were nonsmoking homes, study finds
Bug that causes common cold, other infections often to blame, study finds
Breastfeeding may help prepare a baby's intestines to handle the introduction of solid food.
The mother of a California child who exposed 20 infants to measles last year never intended for her baby to go unvaccinated.
Oh, the things we learn from children.
Study found children from homes that hand-washed dishes had less allergic disease
Breast-feeding, less sterile environment spurs healthier makeup of gut bacteria, researchers report
Do what's necessary to make nutrient-rich foods palatable, pediatricians say
Study suggests that activity with peers might benefit overweight children
But some question accuracy of estimate
Guidelines issued for U.S. high schools
National survey finds one in 10 teen boys also experiences dating violence
Study found half had high blood pressure, half had high cholesterol and 15 percent were diabetic
The gastrointestinal illness typically slows height, weight gains, experts say
Study finds minors successfully purchased smoking devices 3 out of 4 times tried
Study found half had high blood pressure, half had high cholesterol and 15 percent were diabetic
But most believe it puts children at risk, study finds
Expert offers tips on lowering chances of episodes, knowing when to worry
One teaspoon of substance equivalent to about 25 cups of coffee
22 percent were from what parents said were nonsmoking homes, study finds
Study found no change in availability of healthy foods for children in low-income homes
Risk is small, but a sign the disorder is a serious problem, experts say
There are a couple of main theories that try to explain why the incidences of allergies have gone up in developed countries. How much do we really know?

Have questions about your child's health? Ask! Our panel of area doctors may be able to help.

OUR GROWING LIST OF EXPERTS

 

 • SARAH LEVIN ALLEN, Ph.D., CBIS
Assistant Professor of Psychology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

STEPHEN ARONOFF, M.D., M.B.A.,
Temple University Hospital

 

PETER BIDEY, D.O.
Medical Director of Family Medicine at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

CHRISTOPHER C. CHANG, M.D., PhD, MBA, FAAAAI, FACAAI
Associate Professor of Medicine in division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology at UC Davis

 

MARIO CRUZ, M.D.
Drexel University, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

 

KATHERINE K. DAHLSGAARD, Ph.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

MAGEE DEFLICE, M.D.
Division Chief of Allergy and Immunology at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

 

GARY A. EMMETT, M.D.
Nemours Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Jefferson Medical College

 

HAZEL GUINTO-OCAMPO, M.D.
Nemours duPont Pediatrics/Bryn Mawr Hospita

 

RIMA HIMELSTEIN, M.D.
Crozer-Keystone Health System

 

JESSICA KENDORSKI, Ph.D., NCSP, BCBA-D
Associate Professor in School Psychology/Applied Behavior Analysis at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

ANITA KULICK
President & CEO, Educating Communities for Parenting

 

JANET ROSENZWEIG, MS, PhD, MPA
Vice-President for Programs & Research for Prevent Child Abuse America

 

BETH WALLACE SMITH, R.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

W. DOUGLAS TYNAN, Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

FLORA KOPLIN WINSTON, M.D.
Scientific Director of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Center for Injury Research and Prevention