Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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Kids' Health

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Trying to protect children from source of anxiety may make things worse, researchers say
Breastfeeding is known to help ward off infections among infants, but a new U.S. study suggests that protection may be much longer lasting.
Health officials urge good hygiene to limit exposure to Enterovirus D68
Walking, bicycling to school linked to better reading scores in study
Important networks that control behavior are slower to link up, scans show
CHICAGO (AP) - An anti-addiction drug used to fight the nation's heroin and painkiller abuse epidemics poses a threat to young children who accidentally swallow relatives' prescriptions, a federal study says. Some children have died.
When Hannah Rose was born on January 15, 2013, she was a healthy baby girl, 8 lbs, 11 ounces. Her mom Vicki Pizzullo of Levittown said that at first she was meeting and exceeding her milestones and that there was no sign of what was to come.
Those with good childhood experiences will respond better to their own infants, researchers say
Dramatic changes in lifestyle can lead to behavior problems, study suggests
WASHINGTON - More than 90 percent of U.S. schoolchildren eat more salt than they should, taking in an average of nearly 3,300 milligrams of sodium per day, according to a government report released Tuesday.
How early can autism be detected in babies, and how soon can they be treated?
But, study doesn't show that parent-based therapy can change course of autism
Most kids with asthma or food allergies don't have a health management form on file at school.
Magnesium sulfate still useful in short term for helping to reduce risk of cerebral palsy, study says
Plus, teen tobacco use fell to new low in 2013, government statistics show
Detailed history, examination can reveal teens' risk for sudden death, experts say
Researchers suggest limiting embryo transfers during infertility treatments
Important networks that control behavior are slower to link up, scans show
Health officials urge good hygiene to limit exposure to Enterovirus D68
More than 11 million prescriptions may be unnecessary, researchers say
Narcotic painkillers, addiction medications and sedatives top the list
Schools must be well prepared to deal with life-threatening reactions, researchers caution
Trying to protect children from source of anxiety may make things worse, researchers say
Watch for signs that the infant is tired
Combination treatment seems to reduce anger and violent tendencies, study finds
Brain scans revealed varying effects of watching hostile actions in the media
As you’ve already read, Adrian Peterson and Ray Rice are highly skilled athletes who have been accused of committing terrible crimes. Here's how to talk to your child or teen about it.

Have questions about your child's health? Ask! Our panel of area doctors may be able to help.

OUR GROWING LIST OF EXPERTS

 

STEPHEN ARONOFF, M.D., M.B.A.,
Temple University Hospital

 

CHRISTOPHER C. CHANG, M.D., Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

MARIO CRUZ, M.D.
Drexel University, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

 

KATHERINE K. DAHLSGAARD, Ph.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

GARY A. EMMETT, M.D.
Nemours Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Jefferson Medical College

 

LAUREN FALINI
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

 

HAZEL GUINTO-OCAMPO, M.D.
Nemours duPont Pediatrics/Bryn Mawr Hospita

 

RIMA HIMELSTEIN, M.D.
Crozer-Keystone Health System

 

W. DOUGLAS TYNAN, Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

BETH WALLACE
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia