Saturday, August 23, 2014
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Kids' Health

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Making the adjustment 'doesn't just happen overnight,' health expert says
Study found fitter kids had different white matter, which helps brain regions communicate with each other
Increased odds for asthma seen into teen years
Messages that focus on benefits to the child have the most impact, study finds
Child-life specialists use "toys" to help ease the anxiety of children undergoing treatment.
On a midsummer Tuesday morning at the Roberts Proton Therapy Center at Penn Medicine, the children's waiting room is bustling. Preteens punch up basketball video games while younger children squash Play-Doh through a plastic mold or check doll heart rates with toy stethoscopes.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Sometime in elementary school, you quit counting your fingers and just know the answer. Now scientists have put youngsters into brain scanners to find out why, and watched how the brain reorganizes itself as kids learn math.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is creating a regional stockpile of a precious pediatric medicine that is in chronic shortage.
Keeping a sleep diary may help
Some sodas, juices and sports drinks may harm young smiles
Poor nutrition can translate to poor performance in school, experts say.
Appreciating the food we eat is the first step in bridging the gap between “tastes good” and “does a body good,” and here are five tips for teaching ourselves and our children this important lesson.
Dr Kevin Osterhoudt is the Medical Director of the Poison Control Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He talks about the dangers of lead exposure on the developing brain.
Study finds that these kids may be plagued by the condition throughout childhood
Include exercise in your weekly calendar of commitments, fitness expert says
Parents can help their children handle the sting of getting vaccinated
10 percent of children tracked had allergy to peanuts, eggs or milk
Expert offers tips on how to help students adjust to life on their own for the first time
Maternity care practices differ in neighborhoods with more black residents than average, CDC research finds
RSV leading cause of hospitalization among infants, researchers note
Warnings about sun exposure and skin cancer aren't getting through, experts say
Guideline is prompted by concerns about mercury exposure
Understand what's behind the fear
Frequently discuss auto safety
Cause seems related to inflammation of the arteries, researchers say
4 million fewer births attributed to less sex, more contraception, but U.S. rate still higher than comparable nations
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says vaccination helps mother and baby
Screening infants for SCID saves lives, researchers report
A pediatrician recounts how easily infectious diseased can spread globally through air travel and reminds us to get vaccinated for diseases that we can prevent.

Have questions about your child's health? Ask! Our panel of area doctors may be able to help.

OUR GROWING LIST OF EXPERTS

 

STEPHEN ARONOFF, M.D., M.B.A.,
Temple University Hospital

 

CHRISTOPHER C. CHANG, M.D., Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

MARIO CRUZ, M.D.
Drexel University, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

 

KATHERINE K. DAHLSGAARD, Ph.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

GARY A. EMMETT, M.D.
Nemours Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Jefferson Medical College

 

LAUREN FALINI
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

 

HAZEL GUINTO-OCAMPO, M.D.
Nemours duPont Pediatrics/Bryn Mawr Hospita

 

RIMA HIMELSTEIN, M.D.
Crozer-Keystone Health System

 

W. DOUGLAS TYNAN, Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

BETH WALLACE
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia