Sunday, July 13, 2014
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Kids' Health

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Possible explanations include fewer hospital staffers, slower response times, researchers say
A team of researchers show that chronic stress of poverty, neglect and physical abuse in early life may shrink the parts of a child's developing brain responsible for memory, learning and processing emotion.
Mary Cate - born with a rare genetic disorder that resulted in deformities in her hands, feet and face - has become a pint-sized ambassador for kindness.
As many as 650,000 kids worldwide infected each year, researchers report
Study shows having more free time teaches children how to plan, solve problems and make decisions
Doing so creates strongest family bond, researcher explains
Books are like medicine, and pediatricians should prescribe their daily use to build up the brains of their youngest patients, according to a new policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
’Emily Hartline is a Registered Dietitian at Nemours/Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children. She discusses what kids should know about healthy eating.‘
She was last seen a year ago, following the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation for annual visits after age 3. Now 4 years old, she had no past medical history, had never been hospitalized, and had taken medicine only once, for an ear infection.
How to find a bedtime in sync with a child's unique body clock
About 25 percent of toddlers have problems settling down to go to sleep at bedtime.
No link to autism found in large review of previous research on measles, mumps, rubella vaccine
Expert offers tips on avoiding heat-related illness in children
Doctor shares tips for safe use of fire pits, barbecues and campfires
Possible explanations include fewer hospital staffers, slower response times, researchers say
Secondary injuries more common among children who postpone ligament repair, research shows
Giving kids an extra, inactivated dose might speed up eradication efforts, study says
After more than two years of no drug therapy, she's back on medication; development disappoints doctors, researchers
After more than two years of no drug therapy, she's back on medication; development disappoints doctors, researchers
Those with light or noise sensitivities post-injury seem to be more affected, study found
But they're not sure which one might lead to the other
Statement says more research needed on health effects of the nicotine-delivery devices
Gene mutation appears linked to subtype of disorder
This could benefit babies later in life, researcher suggests
This could benefit newborns later in life, researcher suggests
Nearly three-quarters of 12- to 15-year-olds spend 2 or more hours a day watching TV or on computer
But genes don't set academic abilities in stone; experience matters too, experts say
From Chia to Cacao, there are a few things that you can use to add more nutrition to your family meals without messing with the taste. Learn how use them here.

Have questions about your child's health? Ask! Our panel of area doctors may be able to help.

OUR GROWING LIST OF EXPERTS

 

STEPHEN ARONOFF, M.D., M.B.A.,
Temple University Hospital

 

CHRISTOPHER C. CHANG, M.D., Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

MARIO CRUZ, M.D.
Drexel University, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

 

KATHERINE K. DAHLSGAARD, Ph.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

GARY A. EMMETT, M.D.
Nemours Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Jefferson Medical College

 

LAUREN FALINI
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

 

HAZEL GUINTO-OCAMPO, M.D.
Nemours duPont Pediatrics/Bryn Mawr Hospita

 

RIMA HIMELSTEIN, M.D.
Crozer-Keystone Health System

 

W. DOUGLAS TYNAN, Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

BETH WALLACE
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia