Thursday, July 30, 2015

Kids' Health

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“I can hear what you’re listening to!” If you’ve said this to your teen when he or she is listening to an iPod or MP3 player through ear buds, you are not alone. I’ve had to say (yell) it to my own teens! The fact is: our teens are risking hearing loss.
It’s usually not the case. As a matter of fact, there are a number of stories highlighting that one of the largest risk factors for teen suicide is the presence of a gun in the home.
It seems absurd to me that in our industrialized world, too often we can’t trust our own food sources. Luckily, things are starting to change.
Expenses can add up quickly for families dealing with a life threatening illness of a child. Parents generally realize early on that extensive medical bills and other out-of-pocket costs impact their ability to keep up with everyday household bills like utilities and rent.
It was 3 a.m. when my youngest daughter, who will turn 1 soon, woke me up crying last month. Colette had been sleeping consistently through the night for the past few months. But now there was teething. Lately, she drooled more and ate less. I immediately grabbed Baby Orajel in hopes that it would help relieve her sore gums.
Experts estimate that one in four kids and teens is exposed to tobacco smoke at home and more than one in five high school students and middle schoolers ride in cars while others are smoking. This can cause problems that a parent would never have imagined.
Health-threatening snoring and obstructive sleep apnea -- pauses in breathing throughout the night -- aren’t just problems for grown-ups. In a new study, researchers say night-time wake-ups and other clues could help parents get the right diagnosis and help for little kids with often-overlooked breathing problems during sleep.
This year alone, one-in-six Americans will have food poisoning, and the holiday party season is a prime target. So how do you keep your family safe?
Regardless of the slang or street names, they’re actually stimulants like ‘Ritalin’ and ‘Adderall’, which are commonly prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But like many other prescription drugs, they are getting in the wrong hands for the wrong reasons.
Today, Sari took a look at your comments and decided to examine the one recurring theme that ran through the thread: Are parents powerless when it comes to preventing teen abuse of prescription drugs?
Yesterday, Justina McIntyre described how her son Ronnie Powell, 19, a Souderton High School graduate, died in 2008 after overdosing on prescription painkillers drugs. Today she talks about what parents should know and do to help protect their kids and communities.
Today, Justina McIntyre describes how her son Ronnie Powell, 19, of Souderton, died in 2008 after overdosing on prescription painkillers drugs. Her son, a running back at Souderton High School whose talent earned him a college football scholarship, got hooked while working a summer job at a nursing home.
Additional regulations could help lower the number of children ingesting liquid nicotine, which can cause severe illness. In large doses, it can be lethal.

Have questions about your child's health? Ask! Our panel of area doctors may be able to help.

OUR GROWING LIST OF EXPERTS

 

 • SARAH LEVIN ALLEN, Ph.D., CBIS
Assistant Professor of Psychology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

STEPHEN ARONOFF, M.D., M.B.A.,
Temple University Hospital

 

PETER BIDEY, D.O.
Medical Director of Family Medicine at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

CHRISTOPHER C. CHANG, M.D., PhD, MBA, FAAAAI, FACAAI
Associate Professor of Medicine in division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology at UC Davis

 

MARIO CRUZ, M.D.
Drexel University, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

 

KATHERINE K. DAHLSGAARD, Ph.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

MAGEE DEFLICE, M.D.
Division Chief of Allergy and Immunology at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

 

GARY A. EMMETT, M.D.
Nemours Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Jefferson Medical College

 

HAZEL GUINTO-OCAMPO, M.D.
Nemours duPont Pediatrics/Bryn Mawr Hospita

 

RIMA HIMELSTEIN, M.D.
Crozer-Keystone Health System

 

JESSICA KENDORSKI, Ph.D., NCSP, BCBA-D
Associate Professor in School Psychology/Applied Behavior Analysis at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

ANITA KULICK
President & CEO, Educating Communities for Parenting

 

JANET ROSENZWEIG, MS, PhD, MPA
Vice-President for Programs & Research for Prevent Child Abuse America

 

BETH WALLACE SMITH, R.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

W. DOUGLAS TYNAN, Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

FLORA KOPLIN WINSTON, M.D.
Scientific Director of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Center for Injury Research and Prevention