Friday, July 31, 2015

Kids' Health

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Experts estimate that one in four kids and teens is exposed to tobacco smoke at home and more than one in five high school students and middle schoolers ride in cars while others are smoking. This can cause problems that a parent would never have imagined.
Regardless of the slang or street names, they’re actually stimulants like ‘Ritalin’ and ‘Adderall’, which are commonly prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But like many other prescription drugs, they are getting in the wrong hands for the wrong reasons.
Today, Sari took a look at your comments and decided to examine the one recurring theme that ran through the thread: Are parents powerless when it comes to preventing teen abuse of prescription drugs?
Yesterday, Justina McIntyre described how her son Ronnie Powell, 19, a Souderton High School graduate, died in 2008 after overdosing on prescription painkillers drugs. Today she talks about what parents should know and do to help protect their kids and communities.
Today, Justina McIntyre describes how her son Ronnie Powell, 19, of Souderton, died in 2008 after overdosing on prescription painkillers drugs. Her son, a running back at Souderton High School whose talent earned him a college football scholarship, got hooked while working a summer job at a nursing home.
Tom Dietzler, senior clinical director of adolescent and young adult services at Caron Treatment Centers, talks about steps parents should take to understand the choices their teens face and how to protect them.
If your teen picks up a mind-altering chemical, she or he is a candidate for addiction, says one man who has been there and back. Here are eight tips for parents who may be facing this situation.
Lou and Patty Rader’s experience shows that prescription drug abuse and addiction can happen to any kid, in any family-- and how even the savviest parent can easily explain away or ignore early signs of trouble in a teen.
Tim Rader used drugs recreationally through college, but had stopped after graduation when he went to work as a pharmaceutical sales rep. Then he was faced with a shelf of pain pills in a doctor’s supply closet.
Born and raised in northeastern Pennsylvania, Tim Rader had everything going for him. Handsome, popular, high-school quarterback. Then it all started to unravel.
Stolen from medicine cabinets, offered by friends or plucked from a bowl of multicolored pills at a party, prescription drugs like OxyContin, Vicodin, Ritalin and Valium are the killer new teen high.
While you may not have heard of abusing Dextromethorphan or DXM, it is a serious and relatively common act. Here's what you need to know.

Have questions about your child's health? Ask! Our panel of area doctors may be able to help.

OUR GROWING LIST OF EXPERTS

 

 • SARAH LEVIN ALLEN, Ph.D., CBIS
Assistant Professor of Psychology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

STEPHEN ARONOFF, M.D., M.B.A.,
Temple University Hospital

 

PETER BIDEY, D.O.
Medical Director of Family Medicine at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

CHRISTOPHER C. CHANG, M.D., PhD, MBA, FAAAAI, FACAAI
Associate Professor of Medicine in division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology at UC Davis

 

MARIO CRUZ, M.D.
Drexel University, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

 

KATHERINE K. DAHLSGAARD, Ph.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

MAGEE DEFLICE, M.D.
Division Chief of Allergy and Immunology at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

 

GARY A. EMMETT, M.D.
Nemours Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Jefferson Medical College

 

HAZEL GUINTO-OCAMPO, M.D.
Nemours duPont Pediatrics/Bryn Mawr Hospita

 

RIMA HIMELSTEIN, M.D.
Crozer-Keystone Health System

 

JESSICA KENDORSKI, Ph.D., NCSP, BCBA-D
Associate Professor in School Psychology/Applied Behavior Analysis at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

ANITA KULICK
President & CEO, Educating Communities for Parenting

 

JANET ROSENZWEIG, MS, PhD, MPA
Vice-President for Programs & Research for Prevent Child Abuse America

 

BETH WALLACE SMITH, R.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

W. DOUGLAS TYNAN, Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

FLORA KOPLIN WINSTON, M.D.
Scientific Director of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Center for Injury Research and Prevention