Saturday, September 20, 2014
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Kids' Health

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More than 11 million prescriptions may be unnecessary, researchers say
Association between phthalates and lung disorder needs additional research, study authors say
Younger minds are better learners
A group of preschoolers in California have become experts at technology, mastering how to use cell phones, video games and computers.
Important networks that control behavior are slower to link up, scans show
CHICAGO (AP) - An anti-addiction drug used to fight the nation's heroin and painkiller abuse epidemics poses a threat to young children who accidentally swallow relatives' prescriptions, a federal study says. Some children have died.
Trying to protect children from source of anxiety may make things worse, researchers say
Breastfeeding is known to help ward off infections among infants, but a new U.S. study suggests that protection may be much longer lasting.
Health officials urge good hygiene to limit exposure to Enterovirus D68
Walking, bicycling to school linked to better reading scores in study
When Hannah Rose was born on January 15, 2013, she was a healthy baby girl, 8 lbs, 11 ounces. Her mom Vicki Pizzullo of Levittown said that at first she was meeting and exceeding her milestones and that there was no sign of what was to come.
Those with good childhood experiences will respond better to their own infants, researchers say
Dramatic changes in lifestyle can lead to behavior problems, study suggests
WASHINGTON - More than 90 percent of U.S. schoolchildren eat more salt than they should, taking in an average of nearly 3,300 milligrams of sodium per day, according to a government report released Tuesday.
Effective prevention strategies must not be 'one-size-fits-all,' researcher says
Fewer preemies and small babies delivered when moms live near trees, grass, study says
Having epinephrine auto-injectors on hand can save lives, advocates say
Hearing different languages early in life could help reduce bias, researchers say
The result: Greater authority, responsibility likelier early on, study says
Health officials urge good hygiene to limit exposure to Enterovirus D68
Association between phthalates and lung disorder needs additional research, study authors say
Magnesium sulfate still useful in short term for helping to reduce risk of cerebral palsy, study says
Detailed history, examination can reveal teens' risk for sudden death, experts say
Researchers suggest limiting embryo transfers during infertility treatments
Important networks that control behavior are slower to link up, scans show
Health officials urge good hygiene to limit exposure to Enterovirus D68
More than 11 million prescriptions may be unnecessary, researchers say
Narcotic painkillers, addiction medications and sedatives top the list
The recent arrest of Minnesota Vikings Running Back Adrian Peterson has sparked a divided reaction within the NFL around the use of physical punishment with children. Here's why parents shouldn't physically punish their children.

Have questions about your child's health? Ask! Our panel of area doctors may be able to help.

OUR GROWING LIST OF EXPERTS

 

STEPHEN ARONOFF, M.D., M.B.A.,
Temple University Hospital

 

CHRISTOPHER C. CHANG, M.D., Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

MARIO CRUZ, M.D.
Drexel University, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

 

KATHERINE K. DAHLSGAARD, Ph.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

GARY A. EMMETT, M.D.
Nemours Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Jefferson Medical College

 

LAUREN FALINI
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

 

HAZEL GUINTO-OCAMPO, M.D.
Nemours duPont Pediatrics/Bryn Mawr Hospita

 

RIMA HIMELSTEIN, M.D.
Crozer-Keystone Health System

 

W. DOUGLAS TYNAN, Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

BETH WALLACE
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia