Monday, November 24, 2014
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Kids' Health

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Before the U.S. Department of Agriculture set strict standards for nutrition for federally reimbursable lunch programs, less than two percent of middle or high schools would have measured up.
Expert offers tips for parents on how to help children stay calm during hustle and bustle of the season
Texting and "sexting," sending sexually explicit messages via mobile phone, are firmly entrenched in the high school dating scene these days, but until now little solid data have existed on the extent to which these social media connections have been misused to control, harass, threaten, or stalk.
Three-quarters said they'd pull their kids out if others weren't up to date on shots
Adolescents have always found creative ways to keep mothers and fathers pacing the floor at 2 a.m. But teenagers can't be blamed for at least two parental nightmares - rainbow parties and sex bracelets, according to sociologist Kathleen A. Bogle.
Study finds more than 40 percent of emergency calls to U.S. poison control centers involve children under 6
Training teachers to promote structured play among kindergarteners yields improved reading, vocabulary and math scores that persist into first grade.
They’re into video games, role-playing, comics and superheroes. And they may be some of the most athletic kids around.
Why are young adult children emancipating so much later than they did in 1970, when the average age of male emancipation (independent living, paying one’s own bills) was 21?
Study found telling 2-year-olds what they can't eat meant they ate better at age 4
Seatbelts and bike helmets can help prevent severe head injuries, experts say
Expert offers tips for parents on how to help children stay calm during hustle and bustle of the season
Larger peer group is less important when it comes to drinking or not, study says
Get vaccinated, health experts say, because it takes about two weeks for protection to kick in
Turn on bathroom fan while in use
But researchers add that eating behaviors mothers pass on might play greater role than genetics
Better prenatal care still needed to lower number of stillbirths, expert says
Waiting for a suitable match based on antibodies lowered survival rate, researchers found
Federal mandates don't limit added sugar or carbohydrates, researchers say
California researchers find more C-sections, longer hospital stays but no significant complications
U.S. national data shows steady rise, and abuse may pose dangers to mother and baby, experts say
Three-quarters said they'd pull their kids out if others weren't up to date on shots
Tobacco use known to restrict blood flow, researchers say
Tobacco use known to restrict blood flow, researchers say
Most reports of allergic reactions to synthetic food dyes are anecdotal, but natural food dyes in theory can cause an allergic reaction because they contain protein.

Have questions about your child's health? Ask! Our panel of area doctors may be able to help.

OUR GROWING LIST OF EXPERTS

 

STEPHEN ARONOFF, M.D., M.B.A.,
Temple University Hospital

 

CHRISTOPHER C. CHANG, M.D., Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

MARIO CRUZ, M.D.
Drexel University, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

 

KATHERINE K. DAHLSGAARD, Ph.D.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

GARY A. EMMETT, M.D.
Nemours Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Jefferson Medical College

 

LAUREN FALINI
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

 

HAZEL GUINTO-OCAMPO, M.D.
Nemours duPont Pediatrics/Bryn Mawr Hospita

 

RIMA HIMELSTEIN, M.D.
Crozer-Keystone Health System

 

W. DOUGLAS TYNAN, Ph.D.
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical College

 

BETH WALLACE
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia