Monday, August 31, 2015

Chat: Diabetes and your eyes

Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults and nearly 29 percent of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy - damage to the eye's retina. This chat will answer your questions on diabetes and your eyes.

Chat: Diabetes and your eyes

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Eye care is critical for the nearly 26 million Americans - adults and children - with diabetes. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
Eye care is critical for the nearly 26 million Americans - adults and children - with diabetes. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

Most of us are aware of the nearly epidemic growth of diabetes in this country. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) reports that 25.8 million children and adults in the United States — 8.3 percent of the population — have diabetes. Another 79 million people have "prediabetes."

What we may not all be aware of is the effect of diabetes on our eyes. Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults, the ADA reports, and nearly 29 percent of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy - damage to the eye's retina. 

On June 8, from 2 -3 p.m. Eastern time, Julia A. Haller, M.D.,answered your questions. Haller, a world-renowned leader in retinal disease, is ophthalmologist-in-chief at Wills Eye Institute in Philadelphia, and professor and chair of the department of Ophthalmology at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. She was educated at the Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore, Princeton University, and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Haller will provide answers on everything from preventing and managing diabetes-related eye problems to new treatments.

You can read the transcript of the chat below. 


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About this blog
Charlotte Sutton Health and Science Editor, Philadelphia Inquirer
Tom Avril Inquirer Staff Writer, heart health and general science
Stacey Burling Inquirer Staff Writer, nueroscience and ageing
Marie McCullough Inquirer Staff Writer, cancer and women's health
Michael R. Cohen, R.Ph. President, Institute for Safe Medication Practices
Daniel R. Hoffman, Ph.D. President, Pharmaceutical Business Research Associates
Hooman Noorchashm, M.D., Ph.D. Cardiothoracic surgeon in the Philadelphia area
Amy J. Reed, M.D., Ph.D. Anesthesiologist and Surgical Intensivist in the Philadelphia Area
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