Monday, August 31, 2015

Noisy Toys Might Harm Kids' Hearing

0 comments

THURSDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Some toys at the top of children's Christmas wish lists could pose a hearing threat, according to researchers.

They measured the noise levels of 24 popular toys and bought the 10 loudest to test in a soundproof booth. All 10 toys exceeded 90 decibels and several reached 100 decibels or more, which is about equal to the noise of a power mower, chain saw or subway train.

Extended, unprotected exposure to sounds above 85 decibels can lead to hearing damage, according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology.

"Generally, toys are safe if used properly," Dr. Hamid Djalilian, an associate professor of otolaryngology and director of neurotology and skull base surgery at the University of California, Irvine, said in a university news release. "We tested the sound levels at the speaker and again at 12 inches, which is about the length of a toddler's arm."

Hearing problems may occur if a noisy toy is held too close to the ears, they found.

"Children are very sensitive to loud and high-pitched sounds. Unfortunately, hearing loss from noise damage is permanent and not currently curable," Djalilian said.

If you're buying a noisy toy for a child, pay attention to location of the speaker. It's better if the speaker is on the underside of the toy instead of on top. Djalilian also suggested you hold the toy as a child would and listen to the sound.

"If it hurts your ears then it's probably too loud for a child," he said.

Here is a list from the release of the toys tested and the decibel levels at the speaker and 12 inches from the speaker:

  • Road Rippers Lightning Rods: 108 / 68
  • I Am T-Pain microphone: 101 / 64
  • Tonka Mighty Motorized Fire Engine: 100 / 69
  • Marvel Super Shield Captain America: 98 / 69
  • Whac-A-Mole game: 95 / 69
  • Tapz electronic reflex game: 95 / 65
  • Sesame Street Let's Rock Elmo: 95 / 74
  • VTech Magical Learning Wand: 94 / 69
  • VTech Magical Learning Wand: 93 / 60
  • Green Lantern Colossal Cannon: 92 / 67

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Deafness and Other Communications Disorders has more about protecting children's hearing.


-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: University of California, Irvine, news release, Dec. 16, 2011

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
Latest Health Videos
Also on Philly.com:
letter icon Newsletter