Philadelphia's summer festivals from Wawa Welcome America and Odunde to the Philadelphia Folk Festival

Summer is finally upon us — did anyone think it would take this long? — and with it, plenty of exciting festivals to keep you busy on weekends. June opens with Odunde, a huge celebration of African American history and culture, as well as Pride Day. July brings the excitement of our nation’s birthday and Blobfest, a quirky celebration of campy horror. And August closes us out with a block party in NoLibs and a weekend of folk music on a working farm outside Philly.

Odunde (June 10, centered at 23rd and South Streets). Odunde is the country’s largest African American street festival. It starts with a midday procession to the Schuylkill to give blessings to Oshun, Yoruba goddess of fertility and fortune. Afterward, attendees can enjoy 14 blocks of global soul food, original African art, and handmade jewelry, along with musical acts on two stages. (215-732-8510, odundefestival.org)

Pride Day Parade and Festival (June 10, Gayborhood and Penn’s Landing). This year’s Pride Day Parade starts at 13th and Locust Streets before making its way to Penn’s Landing, where the colorful, rowdy festival portion is. Comedian Margaret Cho is headlining this year, accompanied by singer Chris Weaver from The Voice, country musician Jason Walker, and singer Sophia Ramos. (215-875-9288, phillygaypride.org)

Camera icon CAMERON B. POLLACK / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Jeffrey Snyder and Lisa Gallagher  at the 2017 Philly Pride Parade, which stretched from the Gayborhood to Penn’s Landing.

Manayunk Arts Festival (June 23-24, Main Street). This festival is one of the largest outdoor art festivals in the Delaware Valley, with more than 200,000 collectors, buyers, and designers attending. You’ll be able to find all kinds of handmade art, and there are plenty of places to grab a delicious bite along Main Street. (215-482-9565, manayunk.com)

Wawa Welcome America! (June 28 to July 4, various locations in Philadelphia). The multiday patriotic affair celebrates the nation’s birthday with free events for all ages throughout the city, including fireworks on the Delaware on June 30 and the big July 4 concert with Pitbull and fireworks on the Parkway. There are also plenty of museum days, Wawa Hoagie Day (June 28), three consecutive nights of concerts on Independence Mall (July 1-3), and block parties galore. (267-546-5424, welcomeamerica.com)

Blobfest (July 13 to 15, Phoenixville). Head to Phoenixville for this wacky celebration of the 1950s campy horror/sci-fi flick The Blob. The fest includes screenings, competitions, a street fair, and, of course, the recreation of the famous run from the Colonial Theatre. (610-917-1228, thecolonialtheatre.com)

Bastille Day (July 14, Eastern State Penitentiary). Thousands of spectators visit each year for the block party on Fairmount Avenue, which includes confetti cannons, stilt walkers, free Tastykakes tossed from the walls of “the Bastille” and the annual Bastille Day cabaret performance by the Bearded Ladies Cabaret Show. (215-236-3300, easternstate.org)

Camera icon ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Bastille Day at Eastern State Penitentiary.

BlackStar Film Fest (Aug. 2 to 5, various locations). The so-called black Sundance spotlights black films and filmmakers from around the country and the world. One past participant: Ava DuVernay, the first black female director to have a film, Selma, nominated for an Academy Award for best picture. (267-603-2755, blackstarfest.org)

2nd Street Festival (Aug. 5, 2nd Street between Girard Avenue and Spring Garden Street). The NoLibs block party has three stages this summer for bands, as well as plenty of vendors selling craft beer,  food, art, and more. The shindig raises money for the business improvement district, so you know the bucks you spend are going toward a neighborhood cause. (2ndstfestival.org)

Philadelphia Folk Festival (Aug. 16 to 19, Old Pool Farm). The longest continuously running outdoor musical festival of its kind in North America, the Philadelphia Folk Festival draws thousands of music lovers to Schwenksville for a weekend of live music on a working farm. It’s family-friendly, with jugglers and puppeteers to entertain the little ones. (215-247-1300, pfs.org)