TV picks: 'Succession,' 'Pose,' 'Dietland,' 'Younger' and more

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Mj Rodriguez (left) as Blanca and Ryan Jamaal Swain as Damon in a scene from FX’s “Pose”

Pose. I suspected Ryan Murphy’s latest show, set in the ’80s amid New York’s LGBT ballroom culture, might not be my scene, and in some ways I was right. But even if I’m not  hugely invested in posing and performing or the rivalries between “houses” in what’s being billed as a dance musical with the largest cast of transgender actors in television history, I’m all-in for the story of  a family that forms among people who may have been rejected by their own. Mj Rodriguez shines as Blanca, an HIV-positive transwoman whose quest to give her life meaning leads her to become a mother to boys who might otherwise have been lost forever. 9 p.m. Sunday, FX.

Succession. Brian Cox stars as an aging media mogul who’s reluctant to give up the reins to one or more of his four children in a new drama from Jesse Armstrong (In the Loop) whose producers include Will Ferrell and Malvern’s Adam McKay, who also directed the premiere. 10 p.m. Sunday, HBO.

Dietland. Two-hour premiere introduces Plum Kettle (Joy Nash), who ghostwrites the column of a fashionable, but possibly only semiliterate, magazine editor (The Good Wife’s Julianna Margulies). I’ve seen three episodes of what the network describes as a  “revenge fantasy series,” and I can’t say I have a handle on it, or on exactly how Plum’s story might tie to a plot line involving the disappearances and deaths of men accused of sexual abuse. But Nash is great, and I’m intrigued enough to see what comes next. Adapted by Marti Noxon (Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce, UnReal) from a novel by Sarai Walker. 9 p.m. Monday, AMC.

Younger. As this soapy half-hour about a fortysomething woman posing as a millennial to keep her publishing job enters its fifth season, the only rational excuse for my continued devotion is Sutton Foster, who’s still somehow making Liza’s situation seem almost plausible. Will this be the season when it all comes crashing down for her? 10 p.m. Tuesday, TV Land.

Condor (10 p.m. June 6, Audience Network). Max Irons (The White Queen) stars as Joe Turner, a CIA analyst who must go on the run after stumbling upon a deadly conspiracy. Irons makes an appealing hero, and a cast that includes William Hurt, Mira Sorvino, Bob Balaban, and Brendan Fraser helps make this thriller, inspired by Three Days of the Condor, worth your time if you have access to the Audience Network through DirecTV or AT&T. 10 p.m. Wednesday, Audience Network.

Marvel’s Cloak & Dagger. Olivia Holt and Aubrey Joseph star as Tandy Bowen and Tyrone Johnson, two teens linked by a night from childhood that left them with complementary superpowers. Gina Prince-Bythewood (Love & Basketball, Shots Fired) directed the premiere. 8 p.m. Thursday, Freeform.

American Woman. Alicia Silverstone stars in this half-hour dramedy set in the 1970s about a newly single mother of  two trying to start over in a world that’s decades away from seeing the commercial appeal of a Beverly Hills housewife. Mena Suvari and Jennifer Bartels play her best friends in a story inspired by the mother of actress/co-executive producer Kyle Richards (ER, Little House on the Prairie). Paramount, by the way, is the channel formerly known as Spike TV. 10 p.m. Thursday, Paramount Network.

Just Another Immigrant. New “reality” series follows British comedian Romesh Ranganathan as he moves his family from the U.K., where he’s had considerable success, to the U.S. In the first episode, he books a large venue in Los Angeles for an appearance and then seeks advice for selling enough tickets to fill it, attends his first NFL game, and tries to work his way into the L.A. comedy scene. 9 p.m. June 8, Showtime.

The Staircase. Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s Peabody Award-winning true-crime mini-series from 2004 gets another update, with three more episodes dealing with the final disposition of the case of novelist Michael Peterson, who was charged  in North Carolina with murder in the 2001 death of his wife, Kathleen. Didn’t see the original, or the 2012 sequel? Worry not — the streaming service will have those, too, in what’s now a 13-episode series. June 8, Netflix.