TV picks: 'The Good Fight,' Oscars, 'Mister Rogers' tribute, and more

Mister Rogers Anniversary
Fred Rogers, star of PBS’ “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” in 1989. Actor Michael Keaton hosts a special March 5, “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood: It’s You I Like,” on PBS.

90th Academy Awards. Jimmy Kimmel returns as host, but the PricewaterhouseCoopers partner who handed  Warren Beatty the wrong envelope last year won’t be backstage at this year’s Oscars. Some think Beatty and Faye Dunaway — who erroneously announced La La Land, not Moonlight, as the best picture winner — deserve a do-over. I’m just happy the show’s starting a half-hour earlier this year, meaning any big surprises might occur when more viewers are still awake. 8 p.m. Sunday, ABC.

The Good Fight. Audra McDonald joins the cast of The Good Wife’s streaming-only spin-off in the launch of its second season. Fittingly, she plays  a character she once portrayed on The Good Wife who turns out to have connections to the firm led by Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) and Adrian Boseman (Delroy Lindo). Sunday, CBS All Access.

Mister Rogers: It’s You I Like. Michael Keaton, who got his start in show business at Pittsburgh’s WQED, sometimes working on the set of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, hosts this celebration of the beloved children’s show, which marked its 50th anniversary as a national series Feb. 19. John Lithgow, Whoopi Goldberg, Judd Apatow, Sarah Silverman, Esperanza Spalding, and others talk about what made the late Fred Rogers, and his long-running show, so special. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, WHYY12.

Life Sentence. Lucy Hale (Pretty Little Liars) stars as Stella, who’s been living like she’s dying for much of her short life — a life that becomes more complicated than she ever imagined when the cancer that was supposed to kill her unexpectedly gets cured. Once  you get past sick Stella having looked so much better than most healthy people  ever will, this family-centered dramedy from creators Erin Cardillo and Richard Keith (Significant Mother) and executive producer Bill Lawrence (Scrubs, Cougar Town) has things to say about what can happen to a family that’s centered on one member’s happiness.  9 p.m. Wednesday, CW.

Hard Sun. Will the sun come out tomorrow? This coproduction with the BBC, created by Neil Cross (Luther),  encompasses at least a couple of genres as a “pre-apocalyptic” crime drama in which detectives played by Agyness Deyn and Jim Sturgess try to catch a killer after stumbling across a huge secret — that the Earth has only five years left. Wednesday, Hulu.

Jessica Jones. The Marvel show’s second season premiere is pegged to International Women’s Day, which mostly just means we get Jessica (Krysten Ritter), the grumpy private investigator with superstrength and PTSD, back one day earlier than Netflix’s usual Friday releases.  Thursday, Netflix.

Champions. Cocreator Mindy Kaling puts in an appearance in the pilot of this new comedy about a former high school baseball star, Vince (Anders Holm), who’s getting ready to abandon the family gym he’s been running in Brooklyn with his younger brother, Matthew (Andy Favreau). Kaling plays the woman he impregnated in high school, who decides it’s time for him to take charge of  Michael (J.J. Totah), the 15-year-old son she’s been raising by herself in Ohio, so the teen can pursue his show-business dreams at a performing arts school. So, more complicated than the title might lead you to believe. 9:30 p.m. Thursday, NBC.

Sneaky Pete. Second-season premiere of the series from Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston and David Shore (The Good Doctor, House) finds a new reason for Marius (Giovanni Ribisi) to keep masquerading as his former cellmate, Pete. Friday, Amazon.