Black History Month: rapper Chill Moody focuses on mentorship as he builds 'strong legacy as a black man' in Philly

Philly.com’s Instagram account has wound up in the hands of several black Philadelphians who have used it to share personal stories and connections to Black History Month. On Thursday, our Instagram Takeover series continued as the keys were handed over to Philly rapper, and the city’s music ambassador, Chill Moody.

Rapping isn’t the only thing that Moody hangs his hat on. As mentioned, he serves as the city’s music ambassador – a role that aims to lead initiatives to revive Philadelphia’s music industry.

He also has his own beer, “nicethingsIPA,” with Dock Street Brewery.

In his takeover of our Instagram account, Moody decided to share a little bit about his past while shedding light on his blueprint to “building a strong legacy as a black man in Philadelphia.”

To kick things off, Moody shared a little about his grandfather, Roy Lee Spencer Sr.

Moody called Spencer one of his greatest inspirations in life. The photo he shared is one he looks at every day – it’s the background on his cell phone.

It was a particularly special day when Moody shared the photo. He wished his grandfather a Happy Birthday as it would have been his 98th.

“Lessons learned from him helped shape me,” Moody wrote.

Another strong influence on Moody’s life came from the halls of his high school. He attended Overbrook High School.

“It’s Wilt, then Will, then Chill,” Moody wrote as he referred to some of the school’s most well-known former students, Wilt Chamberlain and Will Smith.

The phrase drives Moody. “I want to be legendary,” he wrote. He attributes his hard work ethic to the inspiration he draws from his former school.

Part of his mission to build a strong legacy as a black man in Philadelphia: Moody wants to inspire others.

Moody discussed his partnership with Honda and Big Brothers, Big Sisters for the Power Your Dreams Campaign.

The campaign taught Moody about mentorship and what it truly means to positively impact someone else’s life.

What would Moody like to see for our city? “More ‘oldheads’ looking out for these ‘youngbuls’ (if we’re speaking Philly lol),” Moody explained.

He also used the takeover to share his talent. Moody shared a clip of him rapping next to the Hank Willis Thomas afropick statue that stood near the Frank Rizzo statue during a climate of controversy in the summer of 2017.

Moody said that visiting the statue inspired him and he couldn’t help but rap.

“Besides race, there’s what is and what ain’t right,” Moody rapped. “In that case we should be fighting the same fight. I tell them our lives matter and they combat that like all live matters and that’s the part of the chatter that’s gonna divert our attention from the problem at hand.”

Moody expressed that he wished the statue that inspired him on that day wasn’t a temporary one.

His final post of the day began with #HipHopGotMeHere.

Moody expressed gratitude for the platforms and ventures he’s been able to use to express himself to the world, including this Instagram takeover, but he’s fully aware that it started with the rhymes.

Later that evening, Moody performed at the Ardmore Music Hall along with Raekwon of the legendary hip hop group, the Wu-Tang Clan.

“My music opened the doors so I didn’t have to knock them down.”

More Black History Month Instagram takeovers:

Rahel Solomon

Alex Holley

Patty Jackson