Sunday, December 28, 2014

Has Amanda Bynes lost it? An open letter to the former Nickelodeon star

When you've been raised with Nickelodeon shows like "All That" and "The Amanda Show," it's hard not to be sorely disappointed with how Amanda Bynes has been conducting herself lately.

Has Amanda Bynes lost it? An open letter to the former Nickelodeon star

In this June 5, 2011 file photo, Amanda Bynes arrives at the MTV Movie Awards, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)
In this June 5, 2011 file photo, Amanda Bynes arrives at the MTV Movie Awards, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File) AP

When you're raised and nurtured under Nickelodeon shows including All That, it's hard not to be sorely disappointed with how Amanda Bynes has been conducting herself lately.

We've remained relatively mum on the issue of the star's social media-happy ways lately like when she tweeted, "I want Drake to Murder My Vagina," then retracted that statement days later by calling him "ugly." Then there's the issue of how Bynes, who among the gobs of other young stars, uses the Internet as an outlet to publicly share scantily-clad selfies of her physique as a cry for attention. Bynes' erratic behavior has created enough concern from those who worry the young actress could be the next LiLo, though gal pal and Hairspray co-star Nikki Blonsky recently stated, "She's happy. I don't think that's a breakdown, but a breakthrough." Any certified psychiatrist or mentally-stable human being would realize something is profoundly wrong.

But Wednesday evening, the 27-year-old took to social media again, this time to post several NSFW topless photos of herself to her 860,000+ Twitter followers, upping the ante from sharing tastefully(?)-covered lingerie shots, to selfies of herself barely covering her boobs. The caption, "Rawr!" accompanied the first topless photo, while the second image uploaded was of Bynes seated on her bathroom sink with the left side of her head shaved as she wrote, "Long hair don't care."

The situation bubbled over to the degree that according to Gawker, Kim Kardashian's former publicist Jonathan Jaxson called the cops on the troubled star. He tweeted, "I just spoke to @AmandaBynes and she is soooo messed up on drugs and please @NY_POLICE find her and help her. I don't know her address! @TMZ." Former Playboy cover star Jenny McCarthy also chimed in via Twitter and wrote, "Police are at @AmandaBynes house. I hope they get her help. Enough of this circus. She needs help."

Bynes, in a fit of emotional rage Thursday morning told McCarthy to ""Shut the f--- up!" as part of her series of follow-up messages: "@jennymccarthy I need help? What are u talking about? Aren't u 50 years old? I'm 27, u look 80 compared to me! Why are you talking about me?"

McCarthy graciously apologized and wrote, "@AmandaBynes sorry girl. Looking out for ya," to which Bynes respnded "thanks! I'm sorry I offended you! You're beautiful! I was lying! I'll delete our tweets!"

It's very clear that Bynes has in fact, lost it, which is why we share this open letter:

Dearest Amanda,

Girl, we get it. You were everything as a child: Funny and adorable... at the center of your very own, eponymous show. Life was promising in the '90s. Then the spotlight began to dim, maybe after you had made that movie, What a Girl Wants, which by the way, we thought wasn't half as bad as critics said it was. Subsequently, you've dealt with a DUI, multiple hit-and-run charges, and an eating disorder, which you candidly shared with the public. It takes courage to divulge personal information like that.

In some ways, you are still the same Amanda from The Amanda Show, the girl who was once a comedic role model to millennials (shout to your hysterical role in She's the Man) - a strong and opinionated voice with a promising career in Hollywood. But within the last two years, you have become extremely painful to watch. Where is that successful star who was tasked with making viewers laugh?

Yes, we know: The pressures of Hollywood do not apply to us. You, however, are a public figure, subject to perpetual media criticism. Part of the responsibility of being a celebrity is owning up to your mistakes and accepting that if you need help, you should get help. Reach out to your family, seek advice from close friends, and surround yourself with a strong support network. You're 27, after all. There are many more opportunities ahead.

Tweeting topless pics and telling other women in Hollywood to "shut the f--- up!" though, are not the best ways to handle everyday celebredom.

Still rooting for you,

EL

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Esther Lee Philly.com
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