Sunday, August 30, 2015
BERLIN - Approaching 75, choreographer Lucinda Childs carries her dancer's body regally. Her high cheekbones and upturned collars reinforce the queenly effect. But though she's a grand dame of American dance across Europe, her work has been more or less on hiatus in the United States until recently.
Fringe Festival The fall season starts off with its usual bang, the 16-day melange of theater, dance, weirdness, and adventure that...
Best Boys. Both recent winners of the prestigious Gilmore Young Artist Award are students at the Curtis Institute of Music. Daniel...
Ever since the era of the impressionists, nearly a century and a half ago, much art has been about leisure. Well- dressed people stroll...
The Great Allentown Fair. The place to be for pop-metal, country, and EDM this week is up the Northeast extension of the Pennsylvania...
The Fringe Festival can be tough for families with young children.
This year's Fringe Festival, as always, offers more than anybody could possibly see in its 16-day run.
The Buena Vista Social Club album, which came out in 1997, may not have had a direct impact on this summer's changes in the political...
Alexander R. Greene, 23, a promising Curtis Institute of Music trumpet student who made an impression as both charmer and role model...
This year's Fringe Festival, as always, offers more than anybody could possibly see in its 16-day run.
The Buena Vista Social Club album, which came out in 1997, may not have had a direct impact on this summer's changes in the political relationship between Cuba and the United States.
Alexander R. Greene, 23, a promising Curtis Institute of Music trumpet student who made an impression as both charmer and role model, died Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, in an auto accident about 11 miles northwest of Farson, Wyo., along with his traveling companion, tuba player Benjamin K. Darneille, 21.
The usual favorites were not in favor at Monday's announcement of the Barrymore Awards nominations for excellence in theater.
Karl O. Karhumaa, 90, a sculptor who taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts for more than 20 years, exerting a quiet but powerful influence on a generation of Philadelphia sculptors, died Monday at Wyndmoor Hills Health Care & Rehabilitation Center.
Mary Martello and Johnnie Hobbs Jr. are veterans of the Philadelphia theater scene, yet they've never had a chance to work together before. But thanks to 1812 Productions, Philadelphia's premier comedy company, the two stalwarts of the city's stages come together this week for The Shoplifters.
Sunday American tragedy Famed for its behind-the-scenes meta-drama - the last film for Marilyn Monroe and Clark Gable, with a stellar turn by a fragile Montgomery Clift and a script by Monroe's estranged husband, Arthur Miller - John Huston's classic 1961 drama,
Theater Professional/ semi-professional 1812 Productions: The Shoplifters Philly premiere of Morris Panych's comedy as part of the 2015 Philadelphia Fringe Festival. Closes 9/20. Arden Theatre, 40 N. 2nd St.; 215-592-9560. www.1812productions.org/the-shoplifters.html.   $28-$42.
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org. Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm.
In the 2000s, gallery owner and painter Perry Milou was a regular on the Rittenhouse Square scene and in Philadelphia gossip columns. If a sports team was whipping the city into a frenzy with a championship run, Milou was on the case, painting populist portraits, variously, of the 2001 76ers, the 2005 Eagles, the 2008 Phillies, and even Triple Crown contender Smarty Jones.
JemCon, a convention celebrating the 1980s cartoon Jem, hits the Philadelphia area this weekend.
Marion Boulton "Kippy" Stroud, 76, the seemingly indefatigable founder and director of the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia and the Acadia Summer Arts Program - a.k.a. "Kamp Kippy" - in Maine, died suddenly Saturday, Aug. 22, at her home in Northeast Harbor, Maine.
If music is the universal language it's often proclaimed to be, why has nothing close to a consensus emerged on the two high-profile opera openings of the summer?
Sunday Heavy stuff The intriguing Boston doom-rock quintet Fórn brings its textured, seeping-feedback, dark-matter sound to a four-band bill at 8 p.m. at Kung Fu Necktie, 1250 N. Front St. Tickets are $10. Call 215-291-4919.
Production of a Play Caught (InterAct Theatre Company) The Dangerous House of Pretty Mbane (InterAct Theatre Company) In the Blood (Theatre Horizon)
Every summer, Larry Becker Contemporary Art hits on an esoteric theme for a group show that somehow manages to illuminate shared attributes among its artists that you've never thought of before while simultaneously revealing how very different their work is. It's a neat trick, considering that most of the gallery's artists are painters working in minimal, often geometric, abstraction, if not producing entirely monochromatic canvases.
Echoes of Matisse. Network for New Music's February concert at the Barnes Foundation featured several new commissions inspired by works in the museum's collection, and Network has been putting videos of these new works up on YouTube. The latest is Jeremy
While the noisy and very visible construction for the Museum of the American Revolution is underway at Third and Chestnut Streets, virtually every item in the museum's 3,000-object collection is quietly being conserved at locations all over the Philadelphia area.
Philadelphia Orchestra associate conductors are like U.S. vice presidents: They have huge exposure, a bit of dirty work to do, and ascend to the boss' job only in dire circumstances.
Theater Professional/semi-professional 1812 Productions: The Shoplifters Philly premiere of Morris Panych's comedy as part of the 2015 Philadelphia Fringe Festival. Closes 9/20. Arden Theatre, 40 N. 2nd St.; 215-592-9560. www.1812productions.org/the-shoplifters.html.   $28-$42.