Monday, February 8, 2016
Over the last two decades, Walter Robinson's art criticism and editing have been more visible than the paintings he first became known for, loosely rendered iterations of pulp-fiction book covers that were synonymous with New York's East Village art scene
The jungle drums began in September, weeks after the August 2015 season of the former Center City Opera, now rechristened Vulcan Lyric...
The challenge of any classical music season is to emerge from the masterpiece-du-jour syndrome and into an event that says "See me...
Musical theater loves Philly and vice versa. Here's a partial list of some of the big-name musicals rolling through town.
This spring season is full of new plays (world premieres, American premieres, Philadelphia premieres), all tantalizingly unknown.
Winter's chill arrived a little late and now February could be frigid. But it'll be a hot month in dance.
Two of the most promising museum shows of the spring take a global perspective and seek to upend what we think we know.
This spring's gallery shows are neatly divided between local artists and out-of-towners.
When the hottest year on record - 2015 - was capped off with the area's warmest December on record, no one was feeling the heat more...
Until his final days, local artist Randall L. Dalton, 67, had what those who knew him best could only describe as "a Peter Pan...
Nicolai Gogol wrote The Government Inspector long ago (nearly two centuries) and far away (Tzarist Russia). He had decided, he wrote...
Bury Me Standing, Spanish choreographer Ramón Oller's hymn to Romany (gypsy) life, could easily have been a cliché. Instead...
In the yin and yang of conductors, there are those who blossom in extroverted moments, and those who excel at bringing light and detail...
Jamie Leonhart births her new song cycle, “Estuary: An Artist/Mother Story” this weekend at the Kimmel Center’s SEI...
The program is called Strength and Longing, but Strength and Lengthening might have been a better name. The Pennsylvania Ballet opened...
Gunshots rang out backstage at the Academy of Music. Yet Opera Philadelphia's leading baritone, Jarrett Ott, kept talking as if nothing...
It is becoming accepted wisdom that art must be about more than just art. We now expect art to relate to realms outside itself - as...
It's a Piano World. Mark Ainley collects minutiae. If you want to know where Benno Moiseiwitsch recorded Chopin on Jan. 11, 1952, Ainley...
New This Week Death of a Salesman (Curio Theatre Company). Arthur Miller's depiction of the American family and the American dream...
It's not an obvious career path: Eduardo Vilaro has gone from starring in a middle school production of You're a Good Man, Charlie...
Hollywood was made for Daniel Ezralow. Talents like his don't come along often. Like Jerome Robbins and Bob Fosse, he is one of those...
To complement his many awards and accolades, Scott McVay should be nominated Most Ebullient Citizen of New Jersey. In Surprise Encounters, the published poet, scientific researcher, conservationist, and founding executive director of both the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation and the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation delights in detailing other people's accomplishments.
Colson Whitehead unnerves me. Every time I think I've found the thread that connects his seven books, from his stunning 1999 debut, The Intuitionist, about elevator examiners, to his best-selling zombie adventure story/existentialist dialectic, Zone One (2011), to 2014's The Noble Hustle: Poker, Beef Jerky & Death, a reportorial account of the World Series of Poker, it slips through my fingers. Whitehead, 46, will speak about his diverse writings at Bryn Mawr College on Feb. 3.
Art imitates life in this first foray into "chick lit" by Elizabeth LaBan, wife of staff restaurant Craig LaBan. Despite the disclaimer that The Restaurant Critic's Wife is fiction, readers familiar with her husband's reviews will undoubtedly be scanning the pages for insight into the man who sets the standard for the area's dining scene. The microphone up the sleeve and the decibel meter we know as facts . . . but Dumpster diving to find the source of a sauce?
Elizabeth LaBan is taking a risk. She's publishing a novel about a subject that's close to home. Or rather, lives in her home.
'In public life it is sometimes necessary, in order to appear really natural, to be actually artificial." Which 20th-century American president made the above statement?
Bullish on sexism? New novel cites pig of Wall Street
The Philadelphia literary world is vibrant and alive. Writers love stopping by. Here is just a small sample of this spring's abundance of great reads.
A common saying among designers is that "design won't save the world." The objects in Design and Violence make the case that we may be designing our way to destruction.
More Arts
When the hottest year on record - 2015 - was capped off with the area's warmest December on record, no one was feeling the heat more than Lloyd Traven.
Until his final days, local artist Randall L. Dalton, 67, had what those who knew him best could only describe as "a Peter Pan complex."
Nicolai Gogol wrote The Government Inspector long ago (nearly two centuries) and far away (Tzarist Russia). He had decided, he wrote, "to hold everything up to ridicule at once." Well, social satire doesn't travel well - especially not over time as well as space - so it is puzzling that Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium decided to present this labored farce now and here, especially when there is so much in contemporary society and government that begs to be satirized.
Bury Me Standing, Spanish choreographer Ramón Oller's hymn to Romany (gypsy) life, could easily have been a cliché. Instead, as presented by Ballet Hispánico last Thursday and Friday at the Annenberg Center, the piece was deeply moving - by turns sensuous, serious, and funny.
In the yin and yang of conductors, there are those who blossom in extroverted moments, and those who excel at bringing light and detail into quiet interior passages.
Jamie Leonhart births her new song cycle, “Estuary: An Artist/Mother Story” this weekend at the Kimmel Center’s SEI Innovation Studio.
The program is called Strength and Longing, but Strength and Lengthening might have been a better name. The Pennsylvania Ballet opened its February season Thursday night with four dances that were all long limbs, rippling muscles, bravado, and control. Three of the pieces presented at the Merriam Theater were company premieres, as artistic director Ángel Corella continues his plan to introduce new work to Philadelphia audiences.
Gunshots rang out backstage at the Academy of Music. Yet Opera Philadelphia's leading baritone, Jarrett Ott, kept talking as if nothing had happened.
By Toby Zinman For the Inquirer Oooh, la la! What a delectable little puff pastry of a play this is. Mauckingbird Theatre Company's The Sisterhood...
By Toby Zinman For the Inquirer Nicolai Gogol wrote The Government Inspector long ago (nearly two centuries) and far away (Tzarist Russia). He had...
His ability to pull at both the comic and tragic sides of the Janus mask in a millisecond makes Ezralow’s dances spellbinding.
By Toby Zinman For the Inquirer Janeites, rejoice! Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, everybody's least favorite Austen novel, has been delightfully...
By Toby Zinman For the Inquirer Janeites, rejoice! Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, everybody's least favorite Austen novel, has been delightfully...
By Toby Zinman For the Inquirer It's a rare play that can entertain you and outrage you simultaneously, but that's just what Exit Strategy does. Philadelphia...
This year, the Avenue of the Arts lives up to its name as never before. The Pennsylvania Ballet soars at the Merriam and Academy of Music with Ángel Corella’s first full season of programming. His reworked Petipa classic, Don Quixote, never before danced by this company, will have ballet fans arriving from around the world.
By Toby Zinman For the Inquirer Harvey, a genial, old-fashioned comedy, is currently providing gentle, old-fashioned entertainment at the Walnut Street...
Two of the most promising museum shows of the spring take a global perspective and seek to upend what we think we know.
This spring's gallery shows are neatly divided between local artists and out-of-towners.
When the hottest year on record - 2015 - was capped off with the area's warmest December on record, no one was feeling the heat more than Lloyd Traven.
Until his final days, local artist Randall L. Dalton, 67, had what those who knew him best could only describe as "a Peter Pan complex."
Nicolai Gogol wrote The Government Inspector long ago (nearly two centuries) and far away (Tzarist Russia). He had decided, he wrote, "to hold everything up to ridicule at once." Well, social satire doesn't travel well - especially not over time as well as space - so it is puzzling that Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium decided to present this labored farce now and here, especially when there is so much in contemporary society and government that begs to be satirized.
Bury Me Standing, Spanish choreographer Ramón Oller's hymn to Romany (gypsy) life, could easily have been a cliché. Instead, as presented by Ballet Hispánico last Thursday and Friday at the Annenberg Center, the piece was deeply moving - by turns sensuous, serious, and funny.
In the yin and yang of conductors, there are those who blossom in extroverted moments, and those who excel at bringing light and detail into quiet interior passages.
Jamie Leonhart births her new song cycle, “Estuary: An Artist/Mother Story” this weekend at the Kimmel Center’s SEI Innovation Studio.
The program is called Strength and Longing, but Strength and Lengthening might have been a better name. The Pennsylvania Ballet opened its February season Thursday night with four dances that were all long limbs, rippling muscles, bravado, and control. Three of the pieces presented at the Merriam Theater were company premieres, as artistic director Ángel Corella continues his plan to introduce new work to Philadelphia audiences.
Gunshots rang out backstage at the Academy of Music. Yet Opera Philadelphia's leading baritone, Jarrett Ott, kept talking as if nothing had happened.
It is becoming accepted wisdom that art must be about more than just art. We now expect art to relate to realms outside itself - as a social truth-teller, lens to social injustice, or tool for "activating" civic spaces.
It's a Piano World. Mark Ainley collects minutiae. If you want to know where Benno Moiseiwitsch recorded Chopin on Jan. 11, 1952, Ainley can tell you not only that it was at Abbey Road Studio No. 3, but also that the pianist was using the same Steinway wi
New This Week Death of a Salesman (Curio Theatre Company). Arthur Miller's depiction of the American family and the American dream, troubled, smeary, and tragic. Friday through March 5.
It's not an obvious career path: Eduardo Vilaro has gone from starring in a middle school production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown to becoming an award-winning choreographer and director of an internationally celebrated, New York City dance troupe currently celebrating its 45th anniversary. This Friday and Saturday, Vilaro will be at the helm of Ballet Hispánico when it makes its first Philadelphia appearance in nearly two decades, at the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts.
Hollywood was made for Daniel Ezralow. Talents like his don't come along often. Like Jerome Robbins and Bob Fosse, he is one of those great American choreographers who worked in film and stage. Over the years, he has choreographed the Oscars, the Sochi Ol
It's a rare play that can entertain you and outrage you simultaneously, but that's just what Exit Strategy does. Philadelphia Theatre Company's fierce and funny East Coast premiere of Ike Holter's terrific play, an indictment of the collapse of the Chicago school system, is as relevant here as it is there: urban children - and their teachers - have been betrayed.
FOREVER: That's how long the United States promises to deliver snail mail bearing commemorative stamps, in four bright new designs, recalling the Star Trek TV series, a racial- allegorical space opera set 300 years in the future when it debuted 50 years ago.
Score another win for immigrants. Blanka Zizka, the artistic director of the Wilma Theater (265 S. Broad St.) since 1981, has been named this year's...
The It Girl Through Sunday. The Louis Bluver Theatre at the Drake, 1512 Spruce St. (Entrance on Hicks St.). Tickets: $10-$25. Information: 267-437-7529 or Tickets@SimpaticoTheatre.org.
For classical music geeks growing up in the post-’60s artistic tumult (at least, for one geek for whom I can personally vouch), grappling with the avant-garde meant hour after hour replaying the same LP: Berio’s Sinfonia.