Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Which is the driving force in a successful opera - the music or the story? Opera Philadelphia gave Jennifer Higdon's Cold Mountain its East Coast premiere Friday night at the Academy of Music, and the two-and-a-half-hour work, based on the Charles Frazier Civil War novel with a libretto by Gene Scheer, has some stirring stretches of music.
Over the last two decades, Walter Robinson's art criticism and editing have been more visible than the paintings he first became known...
The challenge of any classical music season is to emerge from the masterpiece-du-jour syndrome and into an event that says "See me...
Musical theater loves Philly and vice versa. Here's a partial list of some of the big-name musicals rolling through town.
This spring season is full of new plays (world premieres, American premieres, Philadelphia premieres), all tantalizingly unknown.
Winter's chill arrived a little late and now February could be frigid. But it'll be a hot month in dance.
Two of the most promising museum shows of the spring take a global perspective and seek to upend what we think we know.
This spring's gallery shows are neatly divided between local artists and out-of-towners.
'The whirligig of time' brings surprises. Among them is Britain's avant-garde Filter Theatre's production of Shakespeare's Twelfth...
On Valentine's Day, we can expect chocolates and roses, candlelight dinners, and maybe even marriage proposals. At the very least,...
In the last few months, Philadelphia artist David Gleeson has been called a "fascist," a "Nazi" and simply "un-American," among other...
Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign had a winning musical message. When he chose Fleetwood Mac's "Don't Stop" as his...
The jungle drums began in September, weeks after the August 2015 season of the former Center City Opera, now rechristened Vulcan Lyric...
Oooh, la la! What a delectable little puff pastry of a play this is. Mauckingbird Theatre Company's The Sisterhood is a contemporary...
When the hottest year on record - 2015 - was capped off with the area's warmest December on record, no one was feeling the heat more...
Until his final days, local artist Randall L. Dalton, 67, had what those who knew him best could only describe as "a Peter Pan...
Nicolai Gogol wrote The Government Inspector long ago (nearly two centuries) and far away (Tzarist Russia). He had decided, he wrote...
Bury Me Standing, Spanish choreographer Ramón Oller's hymn to Romany (gypsy) life, could easily have been a cliché. Instead...
In the yin and yang of conductors, there are those who blossom in extroverted moments, and those who excel at bringing light and detail...
Jamie Leonhart births her new song cycle, “Estuary: An Artist/Mother Story” this weekend at the Kimmel Center’s SEI...
The program is called Strength and Longing, but Strength and Lengthening might have been a better name. The Pennsylvania Ballet opened...
Two of the most promising museum shows of the spring take a global perspective and seek to upend what we think we know.
This spring's gallery shows are neatly divided between local artists and out-of-towners.
'The whirligig of time' brings surprises. Among them is Britain's avant-garde Filter Theatre's production of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, commissioned by the august Royal Shakespeare Company.
On Valentine's Day, we can expect chocolates and roses, candlelight dinners, and maybe even marriage proposals. At the very least, we get some sweet cards.
In the last few months, Philadelphia artist David Gleeson has been called a "fascist," a "Nazi" and simply "un-American," among other slurs. These are...
Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign had a winning musical message. When he chose Fleetwood Mac's "Don't Stop" as his unofficial theme song, it became the sound track for a political moment. It captured a certain optimism, which in turn helped capture high office for the man smart enough to approve this message.
The jungle drums began in September, weeks after the August 2015 season of the former Center City Opera, now rechristened Vulcan Lyric. They portended so much trouble that some opera administrators might think twice about repeating the experience.
Oooh, la la! What a delectable little puff pastry of a play this is. Mauckingbird Theatre Company's The Sisterhood is a contemporary gay adaptation of Molière's 17th-century comedy The Learned Ladies. But, as the program tells us, Paris may be the Place, but the Time n'est pas importante. Buckles on shoes, cellphones in hands.
When the hottest year on record - 2015 - was capped off with the area's warmest December on record, no one was feeling the heat more than Lloyd Traven.
Until his final days, local artist Randall L. Dalton, 67, had what those who knew him best could only describe as "a Peter Pan complex."
Nicolai Gogol wrote The Government Inspector long ago (nearly two centuries) and far away (Tzarist Russia). He had decided, he wrote, "to hold everything up to ridicule at once." Well, social satire doesn't travel well - especially not over time as well as space - so it is puzzling that Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium decided to present this labored farce now and here, especially when there is so much in contemporary society and government that begs to be satirized.
Bury Me Standing, Spanish choreographer Ramón Oller's hymn to Romany (gypsy) life, could easily have been a cliché. Instead, as presented by Ballet Hispánico last Thursday and Friday at the Annenberg Center, the piece was deeply moving - by turns sensuous, serious, and funny.
In the yin and yang of conductors, there are those who blossom in extroverted moments, and those who excel at bringing light and detail into quiet interior passages.
Jamie Leonhart births her new song cycle, “Estuary: An Artist/Mother Story” this weekend at the Kimmel Center’s SEI Innovation Studio.
The program is called Strength and Longing, but Strength and Lengthening might have been a better name. The Pennsylvania Ballet opened its February season Thursday night with four dances that were all long limbs, rippling muscles, bravado, and control. Three of the pieces presented at the Merriam Theater were company premieres, as artistic director Ángel Corella continues his plan to introduce new work to Philadelphia audiences.
Gunshots rang out backstage at the Academy of Music. Yet Opera Philadelphia's leading baritone, Jarrett Ott, kept talking as if nothing had happened.
It is becoming accepted wisdom that art must be about more than just art. We now expect art to relate to realms outside itself - as a social truth-teller, lens to social injustice, or tool for "activating" civic spaces.
It's a Piano World. Mark Ainley collects minutiae. If you want to know where Benno Moiseiwitsch recorded Chopin on Jan. 11, 1952, Ainley can tell you not only that it was at Abbey Road Studio No. 3, but also that the pianist was using the same Steinway wi
New This Week Death of a Salesman (Curio Theatre Company). Arthur Miller's depiction of the American family and the American dream, troubled, smeary, and tragic. Friday through March 5.
It's not an obvious career path: Eduardo Vilaro has gone from starring in a middle school production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown to becoming an award-winning choreographer and director of an internationally celebrated, New York City dance troupe currently celebrating its 45th anniversary. This Friday and Saturday, Vilaro will be at the helm of Ballet Hispánico when it makes its first Philadelphia appearance in nearly two decades, at the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts.