Friday, July 11, 2014
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At Cathy Taschner's first school board meeting as superintendent last month, she and the Coatesville Area School District's board said they were stopping pay increases for some administrators while they reviewed how the district makes payments. Some employees were paid more than they should have been without school board approval, Taschner said.
The cuts are mainly to special-education assistants and noontime aides. More layoffs could come without cigarette tax approval.
City Controller Alan Butkovitz, who issued the report, commended the schools, but also called for legislation.
Four years after issuing a scathing report on charter schools that found conflicts of interest and questionable business practices, City Controller Alan Butkovitz said Thursday that several of the schools had made strides.
Penn State will offer one of its most popular Massive Open Online Courses in Chinese, beginning next week.
The nonprofit foundation that manages Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is offering $1,000 grants to encourage students to transfer to the schools.
Philadelphia teacher LeShawna Coleman had some interesting lunch company Wednesday: President Obama. Coleman, a 13-year Philadelphia School District veteran, teacher coach, and English as a Second Language teacher, had expected to travel to Washington for a U.S. Department of Education event about teacher equity. (The Education Department introduced a program Monday to get more strong teachers in the nation's poorest schools.)
Police and school officials say they don't know who brought the weapon to school or why.
Allied Wire & Cable Inc. needed a sales assistant to support its growing staff at its Collegeville wire manufacturing and distribution center.
The city has stepped up collection efforts to help beleaguered schools, but some taxpayers blast its ham-handed methods.
A cigarette tax to help city schools suddenly has an expiration date.
The bill including the tax to aid schools must now go back to the House.
The New Jersey Senate is delaying a vote on a bill that would slow down use of a new standardized test to judge teachers' performance, as well as those of students and schools, one of the law's sponsors said Wednesday.
A Rutgers University professor who has twice attempted to run for president of Iran says he is disappointed, but not angry or surprised, that the United States reportedly has monitored his e-mail.
Four years after issuing a scathing report on charter schools that found conflicts of interest and questionable business practices, City Controller Alan Butkovitz said Thursday that several of the schools had made strides.
City Controller Alan Butkovitz, who issued the report, commended the schools, but also called for legislation.
The cuts are mainly to special-education assistants and noontime aides. More layoffs could come without cigarette tax approval.
Penn State will offer one of its most popular Massive Open Online Courses in Chinese, beginning next week.
Without the all-important cigarette tax, 1,300 employees of the perpetually strapped Philadelphia School District could get pink slips in August. But the ax has already fallen on 342 school employees, mostly noontime aides and special-education assistants, who began receiving layoff notices Thursday.
The nonprofit foundation that manages Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is offering $1,000 grants to encourage students to transfer to the schools.
Under a proposal unveiled Thursday, tuition at Penn State's main campus would rise nearly three percent.
If there is no cigarette-tax agreement in Harrisburg by Aug. 15, Philadelphia School Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said Wednesday, he will have to lay off employees and consider a delay in the opening of schools.
Being a school reform commissioner was often a tough job, Wendell Pritchett said - a lot of hard decisions, endless meetings with people yelling, and never enough money.
At Cathy Taschner's first school board meeting as superintendent last month, she and the Coatesville Area School District's board said they were stopping pay increases for some administrators while they reviewed how the district makes payments. Some employees were paid more than they should have been without school board approval, Taschner said.
Police and school officials say they don't know who brought the weapon to school or why.
Allied Wire & Cable Inc. needed a sales assistant to support its growing staff at its Collegeville wire manufacturing and distribution center.
Philadelphia teacher LeShawna Coleman had some interesting lunch company Wednesday: President Obama. Coleman, a 13-year Philadelphia School District veteran, teacher coach, and English as a Second Language teacher, had expected to travel to Washington for a U.S. Department of Education event about teacher equity. (The Education Department introduced a program Monday to get more strong teachers in the nation's poorest schools.)
Without the all-important cigarette tax, 1,300 employees of the perpetually strapped Philadelphia School District could get pink slips in August. But the ax has already fallen on 342 school employees, mostly noontime aides and special-education assistants, who began receiving layoff notices Thursday.
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