Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

In the new science classroom, teachers still offer instruction, but more students are getting out of their seats - and even out of the school building – for their lessons. Learning science by doing science is fast gaining traction as educators heed warnings that the economic health of the nation demands a science- and tech-savvy workforce.
Skye Mada and Laz Rizor-Mossgrove plant lima beans with the help of instructor Kaitlin Bear in their kindergarten class at Moorestown Friends School. "Kids want to understand the physical world," said Barbara Kreider, chair of the school
Bonnie Weller / Staff Photographer
Skye Mada and Laz Rizor-Mossgrove plant lima beans with the help of instructor Kaitlin Bear in their kindergarten class at Moorestown Friends School. "Kids want to understand the physical world," said Barbara Kreider, chair of the school's science department.
1 of 30
How your district ranked
For more information, search our data base  (scroll down)


By school name

Click here to load this Caspio Bridge DataPage.


By school type

Select one or more types

Click here to load this Caspio Bridge DataPage.


By district

Click here to load this Caspio Bridge DataPage.


Click here to load this Caspio Bridge DataPage.


Click here to load this Caspio Bridge DataPage.

Here’s a sampling of what you’ll find in this report:


•School by school Advanced Placement, SAT and state test results
•Tools to rank schools by such measures as spending, scores, and salaries
•The broadest look ever at science teaching across the region
•Data on 324 public, private, charter and technical high schools
•See how your school is doing compared with others!

Police released a video of a large group of well-dressed, clean-cut 20-somethings believed linked to a violent attack Thursday night.
When Nancy Kanter and her late husband, Bruce, were looking to move to a new home in 1999 after their two children were out of the house, they couldn’t find anything that matched their criteria.
The faculty adviser for Neshaminy High School's student newspaper was suspended for two days this week in what appeared to be the latest turn in a nearly yearlong battle over the newspaper's attempt to ban the word Redskin.