Thursday, September 18, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Saffron, Inga

Inga Saffron believes there is architecture and there are places, and you can't write about one without writing about the other.

09/11/2014
Last month, a smart young writer at the Washington Post named Lydia DePillis wrote a provocative article about cities and families that lit up every urbanists' social-media feed. In it, she observed something parents have known for a long time: Kids are expensive. "Why, from a purely economic standpoint, would a city on the make try to attract families at all?" she asked.
 
Saffron: Dilworth Park stiff, uncomfortable
09/07/2014
They've reconstructed the space in front of Philadelphia's palatial City Hall, furnished it with a cafe, a high-tech spray fountain and movable chairs, and rebranded it Dilworth Park. But the vast granite prairie is still very much a plaza, with all the weaknesses the word implies.
 
A new wave on the Delaware waterfront
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