Did Bette Midler's 'Hocus Pocus' look really win Halloween

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Bette Midler is Winifred Sanderson from "Hocus Pocus" at the 2016 Hulaween Party celebrating NYRP's 21st anniversary,

AS TODAY is Halloween, Tattle would like to report who "won" the holiday based on numerous media sources:

People.com said it was Bette Midler for her Winifred Sanderson costume from Hocus Pocus.

Eonline.com said it was Kylie Jenner for her "Dirrty" tribute to Christina Aguilera.

Eonline.com also said it was Seattle Seahawk Richard Sherman for his Harry Potter outfit. The website also said that Cindy Crawford's family "won" for their punk rock attire.

Make up your mind, E! This isn't T-Ball.

Buzzfeed.com called it for non-celeb Denise Hill's family in Kansas City. The Washington Post said it was Oklahoma Thunder guard Russell Westbrook as Joe Dirt. 11alive.com said Burger King won Halloween.

Burger King?

Time magazine, meanwhile, said Neil Patrick Harris and his family win every year.

It's Halloween, people. Nobody wins.

Except the kid who gets the most candy.

'Madea' hoses 'Inferno'

In a surprise victory at the weekend box office, Tyler Perry's Boo! A Madea Halloween toppled Tom Hanks' and Ron Howard's new Dan Brown adaption, Inferno. Perry's latest movie about his tough-talking grandmother remained No. 1 for the second straight week with an estimated $16.7 million.

That was enough to scare away the third installment of the "Da Vinci Code" franchise. According to studio estimates Sunday, Inferno bombed with $15 million, about half of what more bullish predictions anticipated. The film did do better overseas, and Sony Pictures stressed that the $75 million budget for Inferno was half that of 2006's The Da Vinci Code or 2009's Angels & Demons.

The unexpectedly poor performance of Inferno was yet another example of an anxious trend in the movie business: More of the same isn't working.

"Inferno joins the long list of sequels that didn't measure up to their predecessors this year and in particular this summer when only three of the 14 sequels released outperformed their immediate predecessors at the box office," said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore.

TATTBITS

* Rolling Stone reports that Bruno Mars and Mark Ronson are being sued for copyright infringement by the 1980's group Collage because they say "Uptown Funk" sounds too much like their 1983 single "Young Girls."

Pitchfork.com appears to have gotten the scoop first.

Tattle listened to both songs and doesn't hear it, except for the funky opening.

* The Washington Post reports that Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry and singer Steven Tyler got a tour of Air Force One and met President Obama when both ended up on the same Florida runway.

"While we're sittin' on the runway [in Tyler's jet], we're lookin' at Air Force One, and we got out, took some pictures and the next thing you know, we're on the plane being given a tour," Perry told music website Vanyaland.

"Steven and I have had some pretty cool adventures, but this one is right up there," he said. "Being a Republican, I still have a lot of respect for the office, you know? Sitting there with the commander in chief and leader of the free world . . . it was really cool."

Drummer Joey Kramer, however, tweeted: "This is not representative of @Aerosmith!" he tweeted. Later he tweeted an explanation: "I don't want to be included in political banter."

* Many viewers of AMC's The Walking Dead took the shocking deaths of two fan favorites in the latest season premiere as personally as a death in the family. One Arkansas newspaper took it a step further.

This week, the Batesville Guard newspaper published an obituary for - spoiler alert- the popular character of Glenn Rhee, who was brutally killed in the newest episode of the zombie apocalypse drama.

With a headline of "RIP, Glenn," the obituary says the character's "commitment to moral principles in a world-gone-mad breathed hope and promise into those around him." The obit seeks justice for Rhee's death in lieu of flowers.

The newspaper says the obituary was written by Frank Vaughn, a soldier currently stationed in Puerto Rico who writes occasional columns for the paper.

- Daily News wire services

contributed to this report.

gensleh@phillynews.com

215-854-5678 @DNTattle