Tuesday, April 28, 2015

On the Market: Hexagonal home in Wynnewood designed by Henry Magaziner for $1.4M

This unique hexagonal home in Wynnewood, which was designed by Henry Magaziner, is on the market for $1.4 million.
This unique hexagonal home in Wynnewood, which was designed by Henry Magaziner, is on the market for $1.4 million. Todd Rothstein
This unique hexagonal home in Wynnewood, which was designed by Henry Magaziner, is on the market for $1.4 million. Gallery: On the Market: Hexagonal home in Wynnewood designed by Henry Magaziner for $1.4M

On the Market profiles homes for sale in the Philadelphia region.

A unique hexagonal home in Wynnewood designed by late architect and preservationist Henry Magaziner has hit the market for $1.4 million.

Current owner Aram Jerrehian says the Montgomery County home has a honeycomb design and each room has six sides. Many other hexagon-themed features can be found throughout the property, something that Jerrehian and his wife, Jackie, decided to continue after Magaziner’s initial concept.

The Jerrehians, who are the third homeowners of this unique property, moved there in 1997. They said they were fortunate enough to meet Magaziner and have him as a guest at the home several times, which he built in 1970.

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  • “He was charming and proud of his work, yet self-effacing,” Aram Jerrehian said of Magaziner, who is credited for his help in restoring City Hall, co-authoring the Germantown Revitalization Plan, which helped preserve the neighborhood as a National Register Historic District, and serving as the chairman of the Philadelphia Committee on Conservation and Historic Preservation, among many other successes.

    The Jerrehians purchased the home as empty nesters after raising their three kids in a smaller colonial home in Wynnewood for more than 20 years. While most couples at that point in their lives choose to downgrade, the Jerrehians saw the home as a work of art, and couldn’t pass up the opportunity to own it once they saw it hit the market.

    Jerrehian, who at the time was operating his rug business, Jerrehian Brothers, had been inside this home as well as many Main Line homes for work, but never forgot this property for its “uniqueness and livability.”

    “We decided to try something different,” Jerrehian said. “I knew about this house, and it came on the market and I decided it was time to move on, move to something a little more unusual than your typical colonial.”

    Jerrehian said each room is about the same size, except for the living room, which is an elongated hexagon with windows about 12 feet high.

    He said that each of the other rooms get abundant natural light because the six sides permit windows on two of the sides.

    In their 17-year stay at the home, the Jerrehians added to the hexagon theme in both the interior and exterior.

    In the family room, they added in a large hexagon skylight – one of five skylights they installed – which is 12 feet long and eight feet wide.

    “That brought a lot more light in,” Jerrehian said. “You look up and see the trees.”

    The room in which they built the skylight in is also an addition in itself. They added that room adjacent to the kitchen and dining room.

    “My wife always wanted to have a room off the kitchen because we entertain friends and family a lot,” Jerrehian said. “This is our third house, and we never had it.”

    This room leads to the hexagonal brick patio – another feature the Jerrehians added – which borders the koi pond and the bottom of the property. There’s even a hexagonal awning above the patio.

    Other six-sided features can be found in the kitchen, which have hexagonal tables, mirrors, and tiles.

    “We kind of got hexagon crazy, Jerrehian said. “Anything that was hexagonal we would say 'oh we have to have that.'”

    One of the other unique features - that’s non-hexagonal themed - is a 19th century marble fireplace in the living room, which came from the home of Simon Gratz, an early Jewish settler in Philadelphia.

    “The house is modern but the fireplace is classic,” Jerrehian said. “In the library there’s another marble fireplace, but it’s modern, so it’s a nice juxtaposition of the two fireplaces.”

    Other special features include 14-foot ceilings, an upgraded eat-in kitchen with a large island, and a free-standing two-car garage.

    The home is more than 5,000 square feet situated on 1.6 acres, and has five bedrooms and four-and-a-half baths.

    The Jerrehians are selling the home now for $1.4 million because they have decided to move to a condo nearby, as they “want to simplify living so we can do a little more traveling.”

    They have enjoyed Wynnewood over the years for its convenience to shopping, public transportation, and proximity to Philly.

    Click to view listing >

    Philly.com