Thursday, November 20, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

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The Street: The 30-year-old Chinese powerhouse Lenovo has earned a strong reputation abroad, including in the U.S., However, Its growth in smartphone shipments within China has eased from 59% year-on-year in the third quarter of 2013 to 6% in the same quarter this year.
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Yahoo will supplant Google's search engine on Firefox's Web browser in the U.S., signaling Yahoo's resolve to regain some of the ground that it has lost in the most lucrative part of the Internet's ad market.
SAN FRANCISCO - Let's say President Obama gets his way and high-speed Internet service providers are governed by the same U.S. regulations imposed on telephone companies 80 years ago.
The Street: Fitness bands are the really hot items in wearables category now, but that may change in 2016, as analysts at Gartner believe that by 2016 smartwatches will comprise about 40% of consumer devices worn on the wrist, led by two things - Apple and China.
The Street: IBM is trying to reinvent work e-mail, using its analytics and data prowess to give employees a new way to converse more efficiently at work, and by extension, targeting Google and Microsoft's considerable hold on the market.
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Federal regulators said a respected Internet privacy company gave its seal of approval to commercial websites and mobile apps but failed to check whether they were indeed meeting standards for safeguarding customers' data.
WASHINGTON (AP) - The head of the Federal Communications Commission wants to increase Americans' phone fees slightly as a way to bring a high-speed Internet connection to nearly every classroom.
Retirement could be dicey for debt-laden and risk-averse millennials - the generation that started coming of age around the turn of the century. But there's some hope.
SANTA CLARA, Calif. (AP) - Chip-making giant Intel Corp. is still struggling to catch up in mobile computing but says its personal computer business is performing better than expected and its return to revenue growth this year will continue into 2015.
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama said Thursday that 19 scientists, researchers and innovators who received the country's highest honor for their life-changing work embody the spirit of the nation and its "sense that we push against limits and that we're not afraid to ask questions."
LONDON (AP) - Financial services startup Square is taking aim at cash registers across the globe, making its point-of-sale software available internationally in English, Spanish, French and Japanese.
LONDON (AP) - A child playing in Bucheon, South Korea. An empty crib in Absecon, New Jersey. Cattle feeding in Behamberg, Austria. Footage from more than 100 countries is being streamed from bedrooms, office buildings, shops, laundromats, stables and barns.
BERLIN (AP) - Four human rights groups have released a tool that lets users check whether their computer has been infected with surveillance software.
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Yahoo will supplant Google's search engine on Firefox's Web browser in the U.S., signaling Yahoo's resolve to regain some of the ground that it has lost in the most lucrative part of the Internet's ad market.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Dissenters within the National Security Agency, led by a senior agency executive, warned in 2009 that the program to secretly collect American phone records wasn't providing enough intelligence to justify the backlash it would cause if revealed, current and former intelligence officials say.
ATLANTA (AP) - Not all selfies are created equal. Some are blurry, are poorly framed or miss the action entirely because you might be scrubbing your thumb fishing for a virtual shutter button as the moment passes you by.
For the last year, T-Mobile has earned a reputation as the scrappy upstart of the wireless industry. CEO John Legere has taken on the big boys in deeds and words - some of them unprintable, burnishing his Mad John persona - while targeting very real customer "pain points": overage charges, exorbitant overseas data costs, early-termination fees, and the like.