Three Philly mansions with plenty of space for holiday guests

One of the bedrooms at 237 S. 18th St. Unit 6A and 6B in Philadelphia

Tis the season to be hosting — and not just for dinner. This time of year, many of us inflate air mattresses, roll out cots, or make up couches for cousins, aunts, uncles, and grandparents in town for the holidays. Other hosts, however, have plenty of space. With some of the most bedrooms in single-family dwellings in Center City and big-time square footage, these homes feature almost enough room for any family and their baggage, er, luggage.

262 S. Third St.
$1,800,000
Monthly taxes: $1,672
Tell me all about it: If your family isn’t impressed by the seven bedrooms in this 5,900-square-foot home, maybe its history will catch their attention. The house was once owned by Michel Bouvier, a cabinet maker who fled France in the 19th century and was great-great grandfather to former first lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. If those details still aren’t enough, how about the 14-foot ceilings and Society Hill zip code?

237 S. 18th St., Unit 6A & 6B
$6,700,000
Monthly taxes: $7,203
Tell me all about it: At 6,500 square feet, this six-bedroom property ought to be big enough to give every family member some space. This double-unit condo takes up the entire sixth floor of the Barclay on Rittenhouse Square and includes a main residence and a separate adjacent one if you like to keep a locked door between you and yours.

711 Spruce St.
$2,300,000
Monthly taxes: $1,560
Tell me all about it: If nearly 5,000 square feet and six bedrooms don’t give you enough space to breathe with your family in town, the enchanted garden in the back of this property might help induce Zen. The oasis is adjacent to a breakfast room and includes a custom trellis and a slate and cobblestone garden. If the garden is spoken for, the three-story property includes a roof deck with amazing views.

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