Wednesday, July 29, 2015

On the Market: Historic waterfront property in Chester Springs for $1.87M

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This historic farm house in Chester Springs is on the market for $1.87 million.
This historic farm house in Chester Springs is on the market for $1.87 million. Lorna Isen
This historic farm house in Chester Springs is on the market for $1.87 million. Gallery: On the Market: Historic waterfront property in Chester Springs for $1.87M

On the Market profiles homes for sale in the Philadelphia region.

For the past 11 years, Sunny and John Pardini have raised horses, enjoyed a serene setting on a private lake, and entertained numerous family members and friends at their historic stone house in Chester Springs.

Their Chester County home, located on Byers Road, dates back to 1760 and is on part of the land granted by William Penn in 1681. It’s adjacent to the Mill at Anselma – a National Historic Landmark – which is one of the oldest operating mills in the country.

The 5,100-square-foot stone house was a big change of pace for the Pardinis. Coming from a new construction community in West Chester, they decided it was time for something new, and ended up going in the complete opposite direction.

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  • “When we pulled into the back of the house it felt very different; very serene; very peaceful,” Sunny said. “When I walked in it just felt very comfortable, and felt immediately like home.”

    John, an orthodontist in Downingtown, and Sunny, a dentist at his practice, were also drawn to the property's large outdoor area spanning six acres where their dogs and horses could run freely, as well as the 6,000-square-foot barn. The two-story barn was a place where John could work on his hobby of restoring classic cars.

    The home sits on top of a hill and the property goes down to the lake, which is shared among 11 other homes in the community.

    Since the couple moved in, they put in nearly $300,000 of renovations. The priciest was the kitchen, which cost more than $80,000.

    “The existing kitchen was enlarged and opened up to frame the expansive view of the gazebo and private lake, just beyond the floor-to-ceiling bay window,” Sunny said.

    They added in top-of-the-line appliances and built-ins, granite countertops and an island, and brick floors with radiant heat.

    They also redid the pool area, where they expanded its length to 52 feet, and added in a 3,000-square-foot deck that required 10 tons of stone. From there, a visitor has a panoramic view of the lake.

    The master bedroom and bath were other major undertakings, where the Pardinis enlarged the suite by converting one of the other bedrooms into a closet-dressing room with mahogany cabinets, marble countertops and a full bath.

    The home includes four other bedrooms and four-and-a-half baths.

    Some special features that can be found around the home are custom built-ins, closets and mantel pieces that were constructed from old chestnut trees that were harvested on the property in the early 1900s.

    The living room features a huge fireplace, built-in walnut bookcases, a wet bar, and French doors to a side patio with a lake view.

    The original farm house from the 1760s only included the current dining room and one of the bedrooms. Two subsequent additions were completed: one in 1858 where side and rear staircases were added, and another in 1960 where a front staircase, two-story foyer, bedroom, living room, and sunroom were constructed.

    Now the Pardinis are ready for another change, and have put the home on the market for $1.87 million. They say they've enjoyed the history and character of the home, but are ready to scale down and travel more and allow a new homeowner take care of the historic gem.

    Click to view listing >

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