Avoiding tricking Social Security

harrygross10243

DEAR HARRY: I have three children. My youngest is 52 years old and has bipolar disorder. She collects Supplemental Security Income, and is pretty capable of taking care of herself.

Her bank account cannot have more than $2,000 in it at any time.

How can I leave one-third of my estate to her and not create problems? Is it possible that I can leave the money to her daughter with instructions that she use the money only for her mother? My granddaughter is well-off financially and holds a very responsible job.

I have absolutely no doubt that she would follow my instructions. Would a joint account for the two of them be better?

WHAT HARRY SAYS: What you are considering is skirting around the law. It appears to me that you know this by the way you made your suggestion. Putting the instructions so clearly in the will could very easily raise eyebrows at Social Security and create problems. I know there are many people who do similar things and get away with it.

I also know that there are any number of lawyers who will help you to do this.

However, my advice is to stay on the straight and narrow and avoid trouble for your daughter and granddaughter.

 


Email Harry Gross at harrygrossDN@gmail.com, or write to him at Daily News, 801 Market St., Philadelphia 19107. Harry urges all his readers to give blood. Contact the American Red Cross at 800-Red-Cross.