The Business of Pharmaceuticals in the Philadelphia Region

Sentencing in the case against Synthes executives

Fourth ex-Synthes executive is sentenced

Calling the conduct "fundamentally wrong," a federal judge Tuesday sentenced the last of four former Synthes Inc. executives to eight months in prison for his role in a scheme to illegally promote and test bone cements used by doctors in back operations, three of which ended with patients dying on the operating table. Read the article.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE COURT CASE: Presentencing reports
Judge's ruling on requests for changes
Sentencing memorandum of Michael D. Huggins, chief operating officer
Sentencing memorandum of Thomas Higgins, Spine Division president
Sentencing memorandum of Richard Bohner, senior executive
Sentencing memorandum of John Walsh, senior regulatory official

Photo Gallery: Lois Eskind of Antlers, Okla. ›

Ike Eskind with a picture showing him and his wife, Lois. She was the first of three patients to die during what prosecutors call an illegal clinical trial of a bone cement. <a href="http://www.philly.com/philly/business/Prison_terms_sought_for_4_over_deadly_medical_tests_.html" target="_blank">Click here for related article.</a> (Photo by David Sell)
Ike Eskind with a picture showing him and his wife, Lois. She was the first of three patients to die during what prosecutors call an illegal clinical trial of a bone cement. Click here for related article. (Photo by David Sell)

McNeil Consumer Healthcare

McNeil Consumer Healthcare´s manufacturing plant in Fort Washington, Montgomery County, which has been closed while manufacturing problems are addressed. (Michael S. Wirtz / Staff Photographer )
McNeil Consumer Healthcare's manufacturing plant in Fort Washington, Montgomery County, which has been closed while manufacturing problems are addressed. (Michael S. Wirtz / Staff Photographer )

An ailment in the house

McNeil Consumer Healthcare's manufacturing plant in Fort Washington was shut down after repeated recalls with drugs that were made there. A musty or moldy smell was detected in bottles of liquid medication. Metal particles were found in bottles of pills. The 2010 annual report says the McNeil recalls cost parent Johnson & Johnson $900 million.
 

A list of some of McNeil's recalled products
A list of recalled children's medications

Dartmouth's focus on health-care delivery

Dartmouth College began an innovative masters program to teach health care-oriented professionals, including one from Philadelphia, to look differently at how health care is delivered, so the outcomes for patients are better and the costs are lower. Dartmouth president Jim Yong Kim, who pushed the formation of the program, is a medical doctor and used to guide the World Health Organization’s HIV/AIDS program. Read the article here.


Examples include:

  • Using checklists for surgeons in operating rooms, as pilots use in airliners.
  • Keeping up-to-date and thorough electronic records to be used by everyone involved in a patient’s care to avoid medication errors.
  • Using community health workers to call or visit patients to remind them to take medication so they don’t have to return for expensive emergency room care.
  • Having better conversations with patients about the risks, rewards and costs of decisions about care.
     

In the videos at right, Michael Lachenmayer, who is enrolled in the Dartmouth program and is director of business process optimization for Amerihealth Administrators, talks about juggling classwork and life at home.

Al Mulley, director of the Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science, talks about the excitement of launching the first class in the master's program.

Paul Danos, dean of Dartmouth's Tuck School of Business, speaks about the challenge of combining a business school and med school for a joint program.

And Katherine Milligan, director of Dartmouth's new health-care delivery science master's degree, talks of why this job was appealing to her.

 

 

A call for health-care priority

Dartmouth College president Jim Yong Kim gives an address on the problems in American health care and Dartmouth’s new master's program emphasizing health-care delivery. Watch the video

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