Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Homerun Watch II

Once again, conditions ripe for homers at Citizens Bank Park.

Homerun Watch II

The Philadelphia Phillies´ Domonic Brown hits a solo home run in the fourth inning against the Boston Red Sox at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Wednesday, May 29, 2013. (Elizabeth Robertson/Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT)
The Philadelphia Phillies' Domonic Brown hits a solo home run in the fourth inning against the Boston Red Sox at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Wednesday, May 29, 2013. (Elizabeth Robertson/Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT)

As duly noted, conditions last night were about as ideal as they get for the flight of batted baseballs.

In fact, on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most-favorable for homerun potential, on his homer app meteorologist Paul Dorian at the SI Organization Inc. rated last night a "10."

Almost as if on cue, the Phillies' hitters blasted four homers, and the Red Sox added one for good measure.

Those ideal conditions looked to be be replicated tonight, with temperatures in the 80s, decent winds blowing out toward rightfield, and plenty of water vapor (what we feel as humidity) in the air.

Warm, moist air tends to be buoyant, and a wind from the southwest is the perfect supplement to the home-run recipe.

The Bank may have a reputation for being homer-friendly, but its dimensions are unexceptional in the unverse of ballparks.

Unlike Veterans Stadium, which was a concrete dam, The Bank is an open-air stadium built in an urban prairie. Hitters thus can exploit the predominant south and southwest winds.

By the way, winds increase with height, so a high fly can get an extra shot of juice.

We would go out on a limb and say that this might be an opportunity for Ben Revere to get his first Major League homer, but the Red Sox are throwing a lefty tonight.

Tony Wood Inquirer Weather Columnist
About this blog

Everyone talks about the weather, and here we write about it.

When we’re around and conditions warrant, we’ll keep you updated about what’s coming, but we will do our best always to discuss weather and climate developments in context and remind you that nothing in the atmosphere happens in a vacuum.

Tony Wood has been writing about the atmosphere for The Inquirer for 26 years.

Tony Wood Inquirer Weather Columnist
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