Wednesday, October 1, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

The opposition leader whom the Kremlin fears

On election day I interviewed the most interesting figure in the new, exciting, youthful Russian opposition movement, the 35-year-old Alexey Navalny.

The opposition leader whom the Kremlin fears

Opposition leader Alexey Navalny. (Trudy Rubin / Staff)
Opposition leader Alexey Navalny. (Trudy Rubin / Staff)

MOSCOW - On election day I interviewed the most interesting figure in the new, exciting, youthful Russian opposition movement, the 35-year-old Alexey Navalny. A lawyer and blogger, he had made a name for himself by unearthing and publishing on line incredible details about massive governmentl corruption schemes.

In a country where official corruption rivals that of Nigeria, and undercuts the economy, efforts to build up small and medium private businesses, and every aspect of daily life, his online work has been little short of astonishing.

But when he was arrested and jailed after leading a protest against rigged parliamentary elections in January, his visibility suddenly skyrocketed. He is the opposition figure the Kremlin fears the most, because his good looks, charisma and anti-corruption fight appeal to disaffected nationalist youths as well as to liberals.

I will be writing more about him, and the interview in a column this week, but he is the figure to watch as the opposition works to keep street protests ongoing, and peaceful, in an effort to open up Russia’s political system. Prior to these demonstrations the Kremlin would no doubt have sought to sideline him, whether by violence or trumped charges that land him in jail. Whether his new visibility will protect him is anyone’s guess.

Trudy Rubin Inquirer Opinion Columnist
About this blog

Trudy Rubin’s Worldview column runs on Thursdays and Sundays. In 2009-2011 she has made four lengthy trips to Afghanistan and Pakistan. Over the past seven years, she visited Iraq eleven times, and also wrote from Iran, Israel, the West Bank, Gaza, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, China, and South Korea.

She is the author of Willful Blindness: the Bush Administration and Iraq, a book of her columns from 2002-2004. In 2001 she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in commentary and in 2008 she was awarded the Edward Weintal prize for international reporting. In 2010 she won the Arthur Ross award for international commentary from the Academy of American Diplomacy.

Reach Trudy at trubin@phillynews.com.

Trudy Rubin Inquirer Opinion Columnist
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