Thursday, July 30, 2015

The 3D ultrasound lets you hold your baby before it's even born

3D printing is a pretty cool idea, even accounting for all the lunatics who'll use it to make assault rifles and anime sex dolls from the comfort of their own homes.

The 3D ultrasound lets you hold your baby before it's even born

0 comments
Young family in consultation with a doctor about pregnancy. The Ultrasound picture is on the table. Above view. 

[url=http://www.istockphoto.com/search/lightbox/9786662][img]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/40117171/medicine.jpg[/img][/url]

[url=http://www.istockphoto.com/search/lightbox/9786778][img]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/40117171/family.jpg[/img][/url]
Young family in consultation with a doctor about pregnancy. The Ultrasound picture is on the table. Above view. [url=http://www.istockphoto.com/search/lightbox/9786662][img]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/40117171/medicine.jpg[/img][/url] [url=http://www.istockphoto.com/search/lightbox/9786778][img]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/40117171/family.jpg[/img][/url]

3D printing is a pretty cool idea, even accounting for all the lunatics who’ll use it to make assault rifles and anime sex dolls from the comfort of their own homes. Brazilian industrial designer Jorge Roberto Lopes dos Santos has an idea everyone can get behind though: 3D printed ultrasounds that provide parents with a life-size replica of their developing child.

Tech Page One explains that a little 3D fetus is more than a novelty.

It [the ultrasound] is one of the joyous benchmarks of pregnancy, but one that has been elusive to the visually impaired. Innovations in 3D printing, however, could change that.

His company, Tecnologia Humana 3D, has been developing new ways to build three-dimensional computer models using data from sonograms and other imaging techniques after initially setting out to enhance prenatal diagnostic tools.

The work took a new direction when dos Santos realized that printing these models would give visually impaired mothers-to-be a chance to meet their babies in utero.

And dos Santos isn't alone. An expert at the American Foundation for the Blind thinks that 3D ultrasounds could help the visually impaired.

Neva Fairchild, the resident expert on independent living at the American Foundation for the Blind, said the models would also benefit visually impaired family members looking to share in the experience of seeing their loved one’s unborn child for the first time.

A model would allow people with impaired vision to know the size of a fetus while giving them a new appreciation of those tiny toes and fingers.” [Tech Page One]

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog
A blog tuned-in to what's happening on the Internet. Odd local and entertainment stories.

Mare McKeever philly.com
Gabrielle Bonghi Philly.com
Nick Vadala Philly.com
Layla A. Jones philly.com
Latest Videos:
Also on Philly.com:
letter icon Newsletter