Saturday, August 1, 2015

Read a novel in 90 minutes with life-changing, speed-reading software

If you haven't heard of Spritz yet, don't panic. The app is only being released on Samsung devices, so Jay Z and Ellen are covered, but the rest of humanity is going to have to wait a while. Spritz is a Boston-based software company that has developed a speed-reading app that will allow your brain to process an avalanche of text in a minimal amount of time.

Read a novel in 90 minutes with life-changing, speed-reading software

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Screenshot via Spritz

If you haven't heard of Spritz yet, don't panic. The software is only being released on Samsung devices, so Jay Z and Ellen are covered, but the rest of humanity is going to have to wait a while. Spritz is a Boston-based company that has developed speed-reading software that will allow your brain to process an avalanche of text in a minimal amount of time.

Basically, there's a text bar like you'd find in a message thread or data entry point on your smartphone. Spritz inputs the material you're reading into the bar one word at a time, aligning the words differently and highlighting a letter in red to help your mind recognize it quicker. In doing so, it eliminates all of the empty space your eyes digest while reading.

At the fastest setting (1,000 words per minute), you could read an entire Harry Potter book in just over an hour. If you don't believe it's effective, cruise on over to Spritzinc.com and give it a try on their website.

The time consuming part of reading lies mainly in the actual eye movements from word to word and sentence to sentence. In addition, traditional reading simply takes up a lot of physical space. Spritz solves both of these problems. First, your eyes do not have to move from word to word or around the page that you’re reading. In fact, there’s no longer a page – with Spritz you only need 13 total characters to show all of your content. Fast streaming of text is easier and more comfortable for the reader, especially when reading areas become smaller. Spritz’s patent-pending technology can also be integrated into photos, maps, videos, and websites for more effective communication.

Click here to watch the video.

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