Friday, February 12, 2016

Philadelphia Orchestra Conductor Cancels

Semyon Bychkov has canceled his Oct. 21, 22 and 23 appearances with the Philadelphia Orchestra, and, as usually happens when interesting conductors cancel, with him some interesting programming goes out the window: Dutilleux’s L’Arbre des songes. We don't blame Bychkov - though we hope he's rebooked for another season soon - since he's canceling to take care of family matters.

Philadelphia Orchestra Conductor Cancels

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Semyon Bychkov has canceled his Oct. 21, 22 and 23 appearances with the Philadelphia Orchestra, and, as usually happens when interesting conductors cancel, with him some interesting programming goes out the window: Dutilleux’s L’Arbre des songes. We don't blame Bychkov - though we hope he's rebooked for another season soon - since he's canceling to take care of family matters.

Lionel Bringuier will appear in his stead. Bringuier (pictured) is a welcome replacement for all sorts of reasons, but the most intriguing aspect to him on paper is the fact that he's 24. This orchestra hasn't always put its best foot forward with young conductors, but, given the relative youth of their music director-designate, who visits this month for the first time since being named, the ensemble might have to get used to it.

Bringuier is associate conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and music director of the Orquesta Sinfónica de Castilla y León. Born in Nice, he has guest conducted, or will soon guest conduct, the New York Philharmonic, Cleveland Orchestra, Boston Symphony Orchestra and other bigs.

So, out are Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8 and Dutilleux’s L’Arbre des songes. Ravel’s Le Tombeau de Couperin stays, and the rest of the program has been changed to Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 with Renaud Capuçon and Musorgsky’s Pictures from an Exhibition.

More information here.

 

Inquirer Classical Music Critic
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About this blog

Peter Dobrin is a classical music critic and culture writer for The Inquirer. Since 1989, he has written music reviews, features, news and commentary for the paper, covering such topics as the Philadelphia Museum of Art at the Venice Biennale, expansion of the Curtis Institute of Music, the Philadelphia Orchestra's bankruptcy declaration in 2011, Philadelphia's evolving performing arts center and the general health of arts and culture.

Dobrin was a French horn player. He earned an undergraduate degree in performance from the University of Miami, and received a master's degree in music criticism from the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, where he studied with Elliott Galkin. He has no time to practice today.

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