Monday, April 21, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Archive: October, 2012

POSTED: Wednesday, October 31, 2012, 8:50 PM
Filed Under: Robert Senior | Working Out
Jog in place. Run the steps at your house. Skip rope. Remember, they’re called ‘inconveniences’ and ‘disruptions for a reason—it’s not supposed to be easy. But it’s only temporary, so it’s worth working a little harder to stay in a routine. (AP Photo)

It’s safe to say Hurricane Sandy has thrown a wrench into at least the next week for the Philadelphia region—whether you’re dealing with storm cleanup, property losses or other disruptions.

Sometimes those disruptions can be of a simpler nature, but no less annoying. For example, if you’re facing a situation where power outages have closed your gym and weather conditions have made being outdoors unbearable, how can you go about maintaining an exercise routine?

Michael Ciccotti, M.D., director of the sports medicine team at the Rothman Institute, spoke with Sports Doc on that topic. Dr. Ciccotti spent several years as orthopaedic medical director for the Philadelphia Marathon, and recognizes that this is prime time for race preparations for the area’s prospective race participants.

POSTED: Wednesday, October 31, 2012, 4:30 PM
Filed Under: Working Out

By Justin D’Ancona

A study done by Indiana University found that over an 18-month period, students who drank soda, spent excessive time in front of the TV or computer and did not participate in team sports, were more likely to gain weight.

Really?! I would have never guessed.

POSTED: Friday, October 26, 2012, 3:35 PM
Filed Under: Children, Teens

Squeezing left hand can help athletes avoid choking under pressure

By Justin D’Ancona

“Choking” is something all sports fans are familiar with. We love to put the “choke” label on athletes and talk about how they perform under pressure.

POSTED: Friday, October 26, 2012, 2:45 PM
Filed Under: In The News | Working Out
New study shows the people who watched The Biggest Loser were more inclined to negatively view exercise. (AP Photo)

Watching TV about exercise may do more harm than good

By Justin D’Ancona

How’s this for an oxymoron?

POSTED: Thursday, October 25, 2012, 4:29 PM
Filed Under: Hockey | Peter F. DeLuca
Philadelphia Flyers goalie prospect Niko Hovinen, lef of Finland, and Danny Briere take a break during an informal hockey practice at the team's training facility, Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012, in Voorhees, N.J. The league locked out its players this month, its fourth shutdown since 1992. (AP Photo/Tom Mihalek)

by Peter F. DeLuca, M.D.

Ah, October, one of my favorite months. Crisp fall weather is here, football is in full swing, the Major League Baseball playoffs and World Series are upon us and the start of the basketball and hockey seasons have finally arrived. What more can an avid sports fan ask for?

Oh wait! The NHL is in a lockout with no obvious settlement in sight.

POSTED: Wednesday, October 24, 2012, 4:54 PM
Filed Under: Working Out

Squeezing left hand can help athletes avoid choking under pressure

By Justin D’Ancona

“Choking” is something all sports fans are familiar with. We love to put the “choke” label on athletes and talk about how they perform under pressure.

POSTED: Wednesday, October 24, 2012, 2:01 PM

by Michael G. Ciccotti, M.D.

Exercise is an activity that takes on a wide variety of forms from throwing a ball to climbing a mountain. It’s an activity that is enjoyed by people of all ages, the young and old alike. There are no limits on size or shape and allows participation at all levels from recreational to amateur and professional. 

What is the real advantage of exercising? Certainly there is a tremendous psychological sense of well-being that comes from exercising as well as the social aspects of interacting with other athletic individuals. But what are the true physiological benefits to exercise? 

POSTED: Tuesday, October 23, 2012, 12:08 PM
Filed Under: Robert Senior | Working Out
Taking information from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study, researchers found a possible association between the amount of time spent watching television and shortened life expectancies. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

by Robert Senior

As the winter months approach, the traps of sedentary behavior are beginning to present themselves—shorter daylight hours, colder temperatures and of course, holiday parties. But a recent article from the British Journal of Sports Medicine should provide plenty of motivation to stay active and on your feet year-round.

Taking information from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study, researchers found a possible association between the amount of time spent watching television and shortened life expectancies. At first glance, the information seems obvious—inactivity and a lack of exercise leads to a multitude of health problems, as we’ve known for some time. But the statistics cited in the study paint a daunting picture:

  • The average American adult spends an average of 35.5 hours per week watching television.
  • Once a person reaches the age of 25, on average, an hour spent watching television reduces life expectancy by as much as 22 minutes.
About this blog

Whether you are a weekend warrior, an aging baby boomer, a student athlete or just someone who wants to stay active, this blog is for you. Read about our growing list of expert contributors here.

Robert Senior Sports Doc blog Editor
Alfred Atanda, Jr., M.D. Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children.
Robert Cabry, M.D. Drexel Sports Medicine, Team physician - U.S. Figure Skating, Assoc. Team Physician - Drexel
Brian Cammarota, MEd, ATC, CSCS, CES Symetrix Sports Performance, athletic trainer at OAA Orthopaedics
Desirea D. Caucci, PT, DPT, OCS Co-owner of Conshohocken Physical Therapy, Board Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist
Michael G. Ciccotti, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician for the Phillies & St. Joe's
Julie Coté, PT, MPT, OCS, COMT Magee Rehabilitation Hospital
Peter F. DeLuca, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician - Eagles, Head Orthopedic Surgeon - Flyers
Joel H. Fish, Ph.D. Director - The Center For Sport Psychology, Sports Psychology Consultant - 76ers & Flyers
R. Robert Franks, D.O. Rothman Institute, Team Physician - USA Wrestling, Consultant - Philadelphia Phillies
Ashley B. Greenblatt, ACE-CPT Certified Personal Trainer at The Sporting Club at The Bellevue
Cassie Haynes, JD, MPH Co-Founder, Trap Door Athletics, CrossFit LI Certified
Eugene Hong, MD, CAQSM, FAAFP Team Physician - Drexel, Philadelphia University, Saint Joe’s, & U.S. National Women’s Lacrosse
Jim McCrossin, ATC Flyers and Phantoms
Kevin Miller Fitness Coach, Philadelphia Union
Heather Moore, PT, DPT, CKTP Owner of Total Performance Physical Therapy, North Wales, Pa.
David Rubenstein, M.D. Main Line Health Lankenau Medical Center, Team Orthopedist - Philadelphia 76ers
Justin Shaginaw, MPT, ATC Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute, Athletic Trainer - US Soccer Federation
Also on Philly.com:
Stay Connected