Friday, April 18, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Working Out

POSTED: Thursday, April 17, 2014, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: Ashley Greenblatt | Men | Women | Working Out
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Does your current exercise routine have you running in circles? When it comes to keeping pace with exercise adherence and motivation, employing a Personal Trainer can help reach one’s stride. However, determining which Personal Trainer to choose can be a challenging task, and it is important to be aware of which credentials to look for and what differentiates one trainer from the next.

This is your body we are talking about. Would you go to just any doctor your insurance covers without reading up on the physician? Probably not. So why entrust the wellness of your body to any Joey Jockstrap your gym throws your way? I am here to help navigate you through what credentials and certifications to look for in a Personal Trainer. Let’s get to work.

Disqualify the Uncertified. As a rule of thumb, always verify that your Personal Trainer is certified.

POSTED: Thursday, April 10, 2014, 10:20 AM
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My clinic sees a lot of athletes, and one question I ask every patient on their initial evaluation is, “What have you been doing at home?” The most common answer is, “Nothing.” 

Many people tell me that when they felt pain, weeks and even months ago, they just ran or exercised through it until it got bad enough that they could not do their sport anymore. So they rested for two weeks, four weeks, two months, then they went back to their sport and the pain came back. Sometimes, the pain comes back worse. No matter how long they rested, the pain returned and sometimes worse and in more spots then it was before they took time off.

Why doesn’t the pain stay away after a period of rest?

POSTED: Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 5:30 AM
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I wanted to open a discussion regarding association of wrist pain and exercise that requires increased weight bearing on upper extremities. In my practice, I see patients from mixed demographics with complaints of wrist pain. In fact, wrist pain happens to be one of the most searchable conditions on the Internet.

A large number of patients associate wrist pain with increase or change in exercise activity—sometimes, a newly developed love for yoga or Pilates.

With multiple benefits comes the unfortunate side effect: pain in the least expected locations such as wrist, elbow and shoulder joints. While this phenomenon is more common in women, we are beginning to see an increasing occurrence in men. How can physical activity that has been praised for thousands of years for bringing emotional and physical well being cause its followers pain and injury?

POSTED: Thursday, April 3, 2014, 5:30 AM

Editor’s Note: To help you get ready for the Broad Street Run Einstein Healthcare Network Dietitian Theresa Shank, RD, LDN, has compiled some of the best advice on how to power up your body for this year's race.

PRE-EXERCISE NUTRITIONAL GOALS

Drink at least 8-16 ounces of water one hour before your run.

POSTED: Thursday, April 3, 2014, 5:30 AM

At Focus Fitness, barre classes have reined supreme and all other disciplines played second fiddle — until now.

With two studios firmly established on the Main Line, early March brought a third Focus location into Center City with the opening of Focus Barre and Yoga at 1923 Chestnut Street.

“Here, there are two great disciplines that fall under one roof so from a client perspective, I feel like they’re getting the best of both worlds since one membership covers both practices,” said co-owner and barre instructor Amy Feeney.

POSTED: Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 5:30 AM
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One pound of mashed potatoes weighs the same as one pound of raw potatoes. No matter how you slice, scallop or roast it, a pound is a pound.

So why do the weight-watching women of the world preach the misinformed belief that lean muscle weighs more than fat? I find most individuals use this erroneous rationale to soften the blow of the scale. When the numbers on the scale begin to tip in an unfavorable direction, it is easy to find comfort in the theory that muscle weighs more than fat—especially if you are resistance training.

While fat and lean muscle weighs the same pound for pound, their composition varies immensely. Muscle has a leaner appearance due to its high density, whereas free-floating, Jello-like, fatty tissue needs more space to jiggle around, due to its low volume. Hence, someone with a high body-fat percentage will look overweight in comparison to an individual with a high lean tissue percentage.

POSTED: Thursday, March 20, 2014, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: Kevin Miller | Working Out
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This week I want mix it up a little and instead of focusing on one topic I want to write a post about ten (10) quick fitness tips. I hope that one of these tips will help you reach your fitness and health goals in 2014.

1. When it comes to warming up most athletes would rather skip the warm up and get right into their training. I understand that things like foam rolling and dynamic movements are not the most exciting drills; however, I believe a proper warm up sets the tone for training. I truly believe spending 15-20 minutes at the start of every session on soft tissue and range of motion drills/movement patterns is important to your long term health.

2. Running wind sprints/gassers at the end of training is NOT speed training. Doing these types of runs has its place when it comes to training. However, if your goal is speed training you need to do your speed work at the beginning of your training session when your central nervous system is alert and fresh. Also, the time spent doing speed training should be short with a long recovery between each run.

POSTED: Monday, March 17, 2014, 11:45 AM
Filed Under: Brian Cammarota | Working Out

My recent article and the subsequent comments presented show some of the difference in opinions when it comes to squatting. I appreciate the responses and discussion and would like to clarify a few things.

First off, to clarify, I DO teach people to squat with their backs rounded, not extended. I have learned these methods form the Postural Restoration Institute (PRI) and once I incorporated these techniques, I found my athletes/clients were healthier. Even if you do not agree that the spine should be rounded, most would agree that the back should NOT be extended or arched. An extended back clearly increases your risk of back injury.

Let’s separate 2 parts of the article. First, the picture at the end (below) shows a deep squat with the back rounded. This is an excellent position to learn how to squat properly. It allows you to stretch when you incorporate deep breathing and extended holds. I would not place a heavy weight over her head in this position, but if she was using a vest or dumbbells, she could perform squats.



About this blog

Whether you are a weekend warrior, an aging baby boomer, a student athlete or just someone who wants to stay active, this blog is for you. Read about our growing list of expert contributors here.

Robert Senior Sports Doc blog Editor
Alfred Atanda, Jr., M.D. Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children.
Robert Cabry, M.D. Drexel Sports Medicine, Team physician - U.S. Figure Skating, Assoc. Team Physician - Drexel
Brian Cammarota, MEd, ATC, CSCS, CES Symetrix Sports Performance, athletic trainer at OAA Orthopaedics
Desirea D. Caucci, PT, DPT, OCS Co-owner of Conshohocken Physical Therapy, Board Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist
Michael G. Ciccotti, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician for the Phillies & St. Joe's
Julie Coté, PT, MPT, OCS, COMT Magee Rehabilitation Hospital
Peter F. DeLuca, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician - Eagles, Head Orthopedic Surgeon - Flyers
Joel H. Fish, Ph.D. Director - The Center For Sport Psychology, Sports Psychology Consultant - 76ers & Flyers
R. Robert Franks, D.O. Rothman Institute, Team Physician - USA Wrestling, Consultant - Philadelphia Phillies
Ashley B. Greenblatt, ACE-CPT Certified Personal Trainer at The Sporting Club at The Bellevue
Cassie Haynes, JD, MPH Co-Founder, Trap Door Athletics, CrossFit LI Certified
Eugene Hong, MD, CAQSM, FAAFP Team Physician - Drexel, Philadelphia University, Saint Joe’s, & U.S. National Women’s Lacrosse
Jim McCrossin, ATC Flyers and Phantoms
Kevin Miller Fitness Coach, Philadelphia Union
Heather Moore, PT, DPT, CKTP Owner of Total Performance Physical Therapy, North Wales, Pa.
David Rubenstein, M.D. Main Line Health Lankenau Medical Center, Team Orthopedist - Philadelphia 76ers
Justin Shaginaw, MPT, ATC Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute, Athletic Trainer - US Soccer Federation
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