Friday, April 25, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Women

POSTED: Thursday, April 17, 2014, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: Ashley Greenblatt | Men | Women | Working Out
(iStockphoto)

Does your current exercise routine have you running in circles? When it comes to keeping pace with exercise adherence and motivation, employing a Personal Trainer can help reach one’s stride. However, determining which Personal Trainer to choose can be a challenging task, and it is important to be aware of which credentials to look for and what differentiates one trainer from the next.

This is your body we are talking about. Would you go to just any doctor your insurance covers without reading up on the physician? Probably not. So why entrust the wellness of your body to any Joey Jockstrap your gym throws your way? I am here to help navigate you through what credentials and certifications to look for in a Personal Trainer. Let’s get to work.

Disqualify the Uncertified. As a rule of thumb, always verify that your Personal Trainer is certified.

POSTED: Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: Broad Street Run | Running | Women
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It has been a long, cold winter. Walking on ice has proven difficult and running outdoors nearly impossible. For those without gym access, this winter has challenged our ability to maintain our fitness goals—except those goals directly related to shoveling snow. With events like the Broad Street Run quickly approaching, we may find that we are trying to catch up for lost time.

With warmer weather in sight, it is important that we gradually resume our training regimens to ensure that injury doesn’t take us out of the race. So, if you’re starting to get nervous about that event you agreed to run with your co-workers as your New Year’s resolution, here are five suggestions for returning to running after a prolonged break:

1)      Have a plan. Plan your runs and figure out in advance your weekly mileage/cross-training goals. This will help prevent a sudden training increase immediately before the event. Unlike studying for a test or putting together that last-minute presentation for work, it is not possible to cram mileage. If you plan on returning to running with a workout partner, make sure you both know each other’s goals, so that you can stick with your plan. Most importantly, set realistic goals to ensure that you are met with success.

POSTED: Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 5:30 AM
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One pound of mashed potatoes weighs the same as one pound of raw potatoes. No matter how you slice, scallop or roast it, a pound is a pound.

So why do the weight-watching women of the world preach the misinformed belief that lean muscle weighs more than fat? I find most individuals use this erroneous rationale to soften the blow of the scale. When the numbers on the scale begin to tip in an unfavorable direction, it is easy to find comfort in the theory that muscle weighs more than fat—especially if you are resistance training.

While fat and lean muscle weighs the same pound for pound, their composition varies immensely. Muscle has a leaner appearance due to its high density, whereas free-floating, Jello-like, fatty tissue needs more space to jiggle around, due to its low volume. Hence, someone with a high body-fat percentage will look overweight in comparison to an individual with a high lean tissue percentage.

POSTED: Monday, March 24, 2014, 9:40 AM
Team West pitcher Jazmine Ayala in action Wednesday. Team Southeast from McLean, Virginia was defeated 9-0 by Team West from Tucson, Ariz., in the 2013 Little League World Series Championship game Wednesday night Aug. 14, 2013 in Portland. (AP Photo/The Oregonian, Ross William Hamilton)

Baseball and softball may be similar sports, but the injury data differs quite a bit. Let’s see what the research says.

Injury statistics

A 2007 paper in the Journal of Athletic Training looked at softball injuries from 1988-2004 using the NCAA injury surveillance system. Over the 16 years of data collection, the rate of injury was 1.6 times higher in games than in practices (4.3 versus 2.7 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures).

  • Preseason injury rates were more than double the regular season injury rates.
  • Postseason injury rates were lower than preseason and in-season rates.
  • 43% of injuries occurred to the lower extremity while 33% were to the upper extremity.  
  • For game injuries, ankle sprains and knee internal derangements accounted for 19% of all injuries.
  • Concussions accounted for 6% of all game injuries and players were 3 times more likely to sustain a concussion and 2 times more likely to suffer a knee internal derangement in a game versus practice.
POSTED: Saturday, February 15, 2014, 7:35 PM
Filed Under: In The News | Other Sports | Women
This undated photo provided by the Russian freestyle federation shows Russian skicross racer Maria Komissarova at an unknown location. Russian officials said Komissarova broke and dislocated her spine during an Olympic training accident at the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014 and was taken into emergency surgery. (AP Photo/Russian freestyle federation)

A day filled with excitement and drama at the Sochi Olympics was marred by news Saturday morning of Russian freestyle skier Maria Komissarova’s serious injury.

Komissarova sustained a broken back by dislocating her vertebra during a practice session on the freestyle course. She was taken immediately to emergency surgery, where doctors worked for 6.5 hours to stabilize her condition.

A spokesman for the Freestyle Federation of Russia confirmed through a translator that the injury was “a fracture dislocation” and that Russian President Vladimir Putin had been to see Ms. Komissarova. 

POSTED: Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 10:01 AM
Filed Under: David Berkson | Men | Women
(iStockphoto)

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the most common medical problems—affecting about one quarter of all Americans. It is also the most common cardiovascular condition in competitive athletes.

Blood pressure can be thought of as looking at the stress on the heart. The top number is known as the systolic pressure and measures the stress when the heart is actively beating. The bottom number is called the diastolic pressure which measures the stress when the heart is at rest, between beats. The greater the stress on the heart, the greater the risk of strokes, heart attacks, and heart failure.

In adults, normal blood pressure is less than 120/80. Blood pressure between 120-139/80-89 is considered pre-hypertension, which puts someone at an increased risk of developing hypertension in their future. Stage 1 hypertension is when the blood pressure is between 140-159/90-99. Stage 2 is over 160/100, which puts you at a 150-300% increased risk of having a stroke, heart attack, or heart failure.

POSTED: Thursday, October 17, 2013, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: Profiles | Robert Senior | Running | Women
Elizabeth Proffitt at one of her races.

So what did you get for your last birthday?

This Sunday, Elizabeth Proffitt of Birdsboro will travel to Des Moines, Ia. to accomplish the feat of running at least one marathon in all 50 states. What’s more, Proffitt will do so just months before her 50th birthday early next year.

That’s right—it’s 50 in 50 by 50.



POSTED: Saturday, September 21, 2013, 6:00 AM
Filed Under: Profiles | Technology | Women | Working Out

Just in time for the new software update, Women’s Health has launched a new fitness App—the 28-Day Fat Blaster (compatible with iPad, iTouch and the iPhone) to help users literally shake up their fitness routines.

The App, which can be downloaded from iTunes for $2.99, offers three different training modes to help users burn fat—power, strength, and endurance.

After choosing your approach, a user simply shakes the device and is presented with five random workouts designed to target that area of fitness. For example, after choosing “endurance” the App produced a workout that included lunges, dumbbell presses, alternating dumbbell lunges, single-arm rows, and finally a set of jumping jacks. All of these exercising are designed, obviously, to burn fat while improving stamina. Choosing one of the other two categories targets your fitness in power or strength.

About this blog

Whether you are a weekend warrior, an aging baby boomer, a student athlete or just someone who wants to stay active, this blog is for you. Read about our growing list of expert contributors here.

Robert Senior Sports Doc blog Editor
Alfred Atanda, Jr., M.D. Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children.
Robert Cabry, M.D. Drexel Sports Medicine, Team physician - U.S. Figure Skating, Assoc. Team Physician - Drexel
Brian Cammarota, MEd, ATC, CSCS, CES Symetrix Sports Performance, athletic trainer at OAA Orthopaedics
Desirea D. Caucci, PT, DPT, OCS Co-owner of Conshohocken Physical Therapy, Board Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist
Michael G. Ciccotti, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician for the Phillies & St. Joe's
Julie Coté, PT, MPT, OCS, COMT Magee Rehabilitation Hospital
Peter F. DeLuca, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician - Eagles, Head Orthopedic Surgeon - Flyers
Joel H. Fish, Ph.D. Director - The Center For Sport Psychology, Sports Psychology Consultant - 76ers & Flyers
R. Robert Franks, D.O. Rothman Institute, Team Physician - USA Wrestling, Consultant - Philadelphia Phillies
Ashley B. Greenblatt, ACE-CPT Certified Personal Trainer at The Sporting Club at The Bellevue
Cassie Haynes, JD, MPH Co-Founder, Trap Door Athletics, CrossFit LI Certified
Eugene Hong, MD, CAQSM, FAAFP Team Physician - Drexel, Philadelphia University, Saint Joe’s, & U.S. National Women’s Lacrosse
Jim McCrossin, ATC Flyers and Phantoms
Kevin Miller Fitness Coach, Philadelphia Union
Heather Moore, PT, DPT, CKTP Owner of Total Performance Physical Therapy, North Wales, Pa.
David Rubenstein, M.D. Main Line Health Lankenau Medical Center, Team Orthopedist - Philadelphia 76ers
Justin Shaginaw, MPT, ATC Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute, Athletic Trainer - US Soccer Federation
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