Thursday, April 24, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Other Sports

POSTED: Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 5:30 AM
(iStockphoto)

Did you know that up to 91 percent of competitive swimmers have reported experiencing shoulder pain? Unfortunately most young swimmers will develop such pain—it’s just part of the sport.The same used to be true of youth pitchers in baseball.

For years, there was growing evidence that youth baseball pitchers were experiencing a high number of shoulder and elbow injuries. These injuries appeared related to excessive exposure to throwing the baseball. It was an epidemic, a talented 13-year old kid’s future ended due to shoulder and/or elbow ligamentous injuries. It got to a point where these kids and their parents were coming to orthopaedic surgeons for the elbow-saving Tommy John surgical procedure. Enough was enough.

In the beginning of 2007, Little League baseball became the first organization to implement a pitch count rule to protect young pitching arms. This is an age-based system in which a pitcher who throws a certain number of pitches must wait several days before competitively throwing again. Even Major League Baseball managers follow pitch counts to protect multi-million dollar shoulders from injury.


Good Shepherd Penn Partners - Shoulder and Trunk Exercises for Swimmers from Good Shepherd Penn Partners on Vimeo.

POSTED: Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 5:30 AM
(iStockphoto)

I wanted to open a discussion regarding association of wrist pain and exercise that requires increased weight bearing on upper extremities. In my practice, I see patients from mixed demographics with complaints of wrist pain. In fact, wrist pain happens to be one of the most searchable conditions on the Internet.

A large number of patients associate wrist pain with increase or change in exercise activity—sometimes, a newly developed love for yoga or Pilates.

With multiple benefits comes the unfortunate side effect: pain in the least expected locations such as wrist, elbow and shoulder joints. While this phenomenon is more common in women, we are beginning to see an increasing occurrence in men. How can physical activity that has been praised for thousands of years for bringing emotional and physical well being cause its followers pain and injury?

POSTED: Thursday, April 3, 2014, 4:22 PM
Filed Under: Other Sports
FILE - In this April 5, 2010 file photo, Tiger Woods listens to a question during his news conference at the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Ga. Woods will miss the Masters for the first time in his career after having surgery on his back. Woods said on his website that he had surgery Monday, March 31, 2014, in Utah for a pinched nerve that had been hurting him for several months. (AP Photo/Harry How, Pool, File)

The biggest sports news on this year’s April Fool’s Day was no laughing matter.

Tiger Woods announced he would miss the 2014 Masters next week in Augusta, Ga. due to back surgery. Woods had the procedure to relieve pressure from a pinched nerve.

Following surgery, a statement indicated that Woods would begin “intensive rehabilitation and soft tissue treatment” within the week, with the goal of returning to competition sometime this summer.

POSTED: Monday, March 3, 2014, 11:04 AM
Filed Under: Other Sports | Robert Cabry
Here is what you need to know when skiing in higher altitudes. (istockphoto.com)

Now that the Olympics have ended, many of us want to get back on the skis or give snowboarding a try.  Going for a ski weekend in the Poconos is one thing, but that trip to Breckenridge is another.

Certainly the slopes are more challenging out west, but many forget the altitude. High altitude can be a real problem for us Philly folks living at sea level. The low oxygen levels that you breathe at high altitudes can cause health problems, and even the physically fit Olympian must take caution.

Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is an illness that is caused by low air pressure and low oxygen levels at high altitudes (above 8000 feet). In most cases the symptoms are mild and feel like a hangover. Headache, nausea and fatigue are most common, but additional symptoms include dizziness, loss of appetite, rapid heart rate and shortness of breath. Mild AMS is not life-threatening, but can be a warning sign of a more serious problem to come. AMS can lead to lung or brain swelling that quickly can become fatal. The good news is most people only suffer the mild symptoms of AMS.

POSTED: Friday, February 21, 2014, 5:30 AM

No matter how you are involved in athletics, you need to know the dangers that accompany your sport. This Strained Sports infographic will help you digest the mountain of statistics and help you better understand how the injuries stack up against each other from sport to sport.

Purpose

With the hope of informing, this graphic has the purpose of raising awareness of sports injuries, whether they are minor ankle problems or fatal brain injuries. Because the potential dangers aren’t always at the forefront of discussions, learning about the more serious side of sports will allow you to make an educated decision about participating. Additionally, this infographic can serve as a guide to understand what sort of injuries to watch for by sport.

POSTED: Saturday, February 15, 2014, 7:35 PM
Filed Under: In The News | Other Sports | Women
This undated photo provided by the Russian freestyle federation shows Russian skicross racer Maria Komissarova at an unknown location. Russian officials said Komissarova broke and dislocated her spine during an Olympic training accident at the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014 and was taken into emergency surgery. (AP Photo/Russian freestyle federation)

A day filled with excitement and drama at the Sochi Olympics was marred by news Saturday morning of Russian freestyle skier Maria Komissarova’s serious injury.

Komissarova sustained a broken back by dislocating her vertebra during a practice session on the freestyle course. She was taken immediately to emergency surgery, where doctors worked for 6.5 hours to stabilize her condition.

A spokesman for the Freestyle Federation of Russia confirmed through a translator that the injury was “a fracture dislocation” and that Russian President Vladimir Putin had been to see Ms. Komissarova. 

POSTED: Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 6:00 AM

This is the last blog of a three part series on winter scholastic sports.  Let’s head to the mat.

Sprains/Strains

Sprains and strains account for nearly half of all wrestling injuries with the shoulder being more common in high school wrestlers and the knee more common in college.  About 40 percent of those injured return to the mat within 1 week. 

POSTED: Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 6:00 AM

A 2008 article by Yard et al in The American Journal of Sports Medicine calculated rates of injury among high school and college wrestlers during the 2005-2006 season using the High School Reporting Information Online (RIOTM) and the NCAA Injury Surveillance System (ISS).   It also characterized the incidence and type injuries and compared risk factors for high school and college wrestling injuries. 

There were 387 injuries among participating high school wrestlers during 166,279 athlete-exposures, for an injury rate of 2.33 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures (AE). 

258 injuries occurred among college wrestlers during 35,599 athlete-exposures, for an injury rate of 7.25 injuries per 1000 AE.  The injury rate was higher in college than in high school. 

About this blog

Whether you are a weekend warrior, an aging baby boomer, a student athlete or just someone who wants to stay active, this blog is for you. Read about our growing list of expert contributors here.

Robert Senior Sports Doc blog Editor
Alfred Atanda, Jr., M.D. Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children.
Robert Cabry, M.D. Drexel Sports Medicine, Team physician - U.S. Figure Skating, Assoc. Team Physician - Drexel
Brian Cammarota, MEd, ATC, CSCS, CES Symetrix Sports Performance, athletic trainer at OAA Orthopaedics
Desirea D. Caucci, PT, DPT, OCS Co-owner of Conshohocken Physical Therapy, Board Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist
Michael G. Ciccotti, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician for the Phillies & St. Joe's
Julie Coté, PT, MPT, OCS, COMT Magee Rehabilitation Hospital
Peter F. DeLuca, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician - Eagles, Head Orthopedic Surgeon - Flyers
Joel H. Fish, Ph.D. Director - The Center For Sport Psychology, Sports Psychology Consultant - 76ers & Flyers
R. Robert Franks, D.O. Rothman Institute, Team Physician - USA Wrestling, Consultant - Philadelphia Phillies
Ashley B. Greenblatt, ACE-CPT Certified Personal Trainer at The Sporting Club at The Bellevue
Cassie Haynes, JD, MPH Co-Founder, Trap Door Athletics, CrossFit LI Certified
Eugene Hong, MD, CAQSM, FAAFP Team Physician - Drexel, Philadelphia University, Saint Joe’s, & U.S. National Women’s Lacrosse
Jim McCrossin, ATC Flyers and Phantoms
Kevin Miller Fitness Coach, Philadelphia Union
Heather Moore, PT, DPT, CKTP Owner of Total Performance Physical Therapy, North Wales, Pa.
David Rubenstein, M.D. Main Line Health Lankenau Medical Center, Team Orthopedist - Philadelphia 76ers
Justin Shaginaw, MPT, ATC Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute, Athletic Trainer - US Soccer Federation
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