Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

In The News

POSTED: Friday, April 11, 2014, 10:48 AM
Filed Under: In The News | Running

The annual Stroehmann 5K Walk+Run Against Hunger takes place tomorrow morning at 8 a.m. sharp, starting from the steps of the Philadelphia Art Museum.

Last year’s event attracted over 4,000 participants and raised almost $250,000 for area organizations including the Coalition Against Hunger, SHARE, The Food Trust and Philabundance. The event has been a spring tradition in Philadelphia since 1996.

After the start of the run, the opening ceremonies commence at 8:30 a.m.—when many runners should be crossing the finish line. Speakers will include executive from Stroehmann bakeries and Acme Markets, as well as an active Philadelphia Eagles player (the player’s name was not available as of today.)

POSTED: Wednesday, March 26, 2014, 5:30 AM
Jon Darling, athletic trainer for North Fargo, N.D. Spartan High School, tapes senior Marlee Nasset's ankle prior to track practice, Friday, May 14, 2004. (AP Photo/Alyssa Hurst)

While watching our favorite sports teams, we are generally hoping for 2 things—a win for our team and no injuries.

Injuries have always been a part of sports and likely always will be. The difference between a championship season and missing the playoffs may be 1-2 injuries. Fortunately, professional and college teams almost always have an athletic trainer on site to care for that injury.

Athletic trainers (ATs) are nationally certified after passing a board exam and obtaining a bachelor’s or master’s degree in athletic training. They are state-licensed and work under the direction of a physician in most states. The services provided by ATs comprise prevention, emergency care, clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions.1 ATs are the first medical providers to respond to an on field emergency. They care for the individual player (often alone), until an ambulance arrives to transport the player to a hospital.

POSTED: Friday, March 21, 2014, 5:03 PM
Filed Under: Baseball | In The News
The Phillies' Freddy Galvis. (Yong Kim/Staff Photographer)

Phillies shortstop Freddy Galvis was hospitalized with a staph infection in his leg early Friday morning. By the afternoon, one source reported the infection was being treated as MRSA.

Galvis will begin the season on the disabled list, but the more immediate concern is for his personal well-being—and that of other Phillies players, personnel and even opponents.

The best-known cases of MRSA outbreak in recent sports history involved NFL teams. The St. Louis Rams, Cleveland Browns and Tampa Bay Buccaneers have all experienced somewhat widespread outbreaks since 2003. Well-known players including All-Pro LeCharles Bentley and Kellen Winslow Jr. were affected.

POSTED: Thursday, March 20, 2014, 5:00 AM
Filed Under: In The News | Kelly O'Shea | Running

For many new runners, 13.1 miles can be a tedious task. Boredom often sets in around miles six or seven and for the rest of the race, runners do their best to keep themselves from calculating their distance to the finish line.

To combat boredom, 24-year-old Kelly Roberts of Brooklyn entertained herself by taking selfies with hot guys and posting them to her Instagram account while she ran the NYC Half-Marathon on March 16th. 

“I was standing in my corral right before the race started and I noticed there was a cute guy behind me and thought ‘I should find one every mile,’” recalled Roberts.

POSTED: Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 11:05 AM
Filed Under: Basketball | In The News
Kansas center Joel Embiid (21) shoots over Iona forward Daniel Robinson (44) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game at Allen Fieldhouse in Lawrence, Kan., Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

March Madness is officially upon us. In Philadelphia, the focus is squarely upon the lower portion of the South bracket, where Villanova and St. Joe’s are on a potential collision course for a Saturday matchup. Nationally, however, one of the big storylines is the health of Kansas freshman center Joel Embiid.

Embiid, a 7-foot center, was one of the top incoming prospects in college hoops in this season. But the freshman has been sidelined since March 1 with a stress fracture in his lower back.

Reports soon followed that Embiid would miss the Big 12 Tournament (he did) but would likely return at some point during the NCAA Tournament. Skeptics responded that such a quick return was dangerous to Embiid’s long-term health.

POSTED: Monday, March 10, 2014, 11:41 AM

The sports medicine world lost one of its pioneers late Thursday night when Dr. Frank Jobe passed away in Santa Monica, Calif. at the age of 88.

As co-founder of the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic, Dr. Jobe was perhaps best known as the Godfather of Tommy John Surgery, the preferred term for ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction. He performed the first such procedure on its namesake, a Dodgers pitcher, in 1974.

Dr. Jobe also served as a mentor to Michael Ciccotti, M.D., director of sports medicine at the Rothman Institute and head team physician for the Phillies.

POSTED: Friday, March 7, 2014, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: In The News | Running
A scene from a previous 1/2 sauer 1/2 kraut run.

Finishing a race is cause for celebration. After weeks (months?) of training, dieting, and living with a great deal of structure, it’s time to relax. Maybe you pop a few beers or sit down to a feast of a dinner.

Imagine being able to indulge right at the finish line! Such is the inspiration for the ½ Sauer ½ Kraut Marathon & Half-Marathon, scheduled for June 14 at 8 a.m. through the trails of Pennypack Park.

Runners are treated to a jaunt through one of Philadelphia’s more scenic, peaceful settings, and greeted at the finish line with a German feast including bratwurst, sauerkraut and German potato pancakes.

POSTED: Wednesday, February 26, 2014, 9:42 AM
Dr. Paul Butler voted to ban football in his New Hampshire school district, while Dr. Doug Swift won two Super Bowls before turning his attention to medicine. (Robert Senior / Philly.com)

On Tuesday night, three accomplished doctors from three very different backgrounds convened at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia to discuss the issue of head injuries in football.

The talk, entitled “Football: America’s Pride or America’s Shame?” featured Doug Swift, MD, who won two Super Bowls with the Miami Dolphins of the 1970s before turning his attention to medicine as an anesthesiologist; H. Branch Coslett, MD, professor in neurology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania; and Paul Butler, MD, a retired surgeon who gained fame—or notoriety, depending on your stance—by voting to end football in his local school district, where he served as a board member.

The title of the talk “America’s Pride or America’s Shame?” didn’t seem to leave much room for a middle ground, but in the end the highlight of the presentation was its non-judgmental approach to accepting that there is a large gray area in the entire discussion. Football players, coaches, doctors, even opponents of the sport were able to walk away saying they’d learned something, and hopefully with a greater understanding of the other side of the debate.

About this blog

Whether you are a weekend warrior, an aging baby boomer, a student athlete or just someone who wants to stay active, this blog is for you. Read about our growing list of expert contributors here.

Robert Senior Sports Doc blog Editor
Alfred Atanda, Jr., M.D. Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children.
Robert Cabry, M.D. Drexel Sports Medicine, Team physician - U.S. Figure Skating, Assoc. Team Physician - Drexel
Brian Cammarota, MEd, ATC, CSCS, CES Symetrix Sports Performance, athletic trainer at OAA Orthopaedics
Desirea D. Caucci, PT, DPT, OCS Co-owner of Conshohocken Physical Therapy, Board Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist
Michael G. Ciccotti, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician for the Phillies & St. Joe's
Julie Coté, PT, MPT, OCS, COMT Magee Rehabilitation Hospital
Peter F. DeLuca, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician - Eagles, Head Orthopedic Surgeon - Flyers
Joel H. Fish, Ph.D. Director - The Center For Sport Psychology, Sports Psychology Consultant - 76ers & Flyers
R. Robert Franks, D.O. Rothman Institute, Team Physician - USA Wrestling, Consultant - Philadelphia Phillies
Ashley B. Greenblatt, ACE-CPT Certified Personal Trainer at The Sporting Club at The Bellevue
Cassie Haynes, JD, MPH Co-Founder, Trap Door Athletics, CrossFit LI Certified
Eugene Hong, MD, CAQSM, FAAFP Team Physician - Drexel, Philadelphia University, Saint Joe’s, & U.S. National Women’s Lacrosse
Jim McCrossin, ATC Flyers and Phantoms
Kevin Miller Fitness Coach, Philadelphia Union
Heather Moore, PT, DPT, CKTP Owner of Total Performance Physical Therapy, North Wales, Pa.
David Rubenstein, M.D. Main Line Health Lankenau Medical Center, Team Orthopedist - Philadelphia 76ers
Justin Shaginaw, MPT, ATC Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute, Athletic Trainer - US Soccer Federation
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