Monday, April 21, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

POSTED: Sunday, March 30, 2014, 10:11 AM

It may have been a dark and rainy Sunday morning, but there was a lot of love in Philadelphia as runners of the inaugural Love Run Half Marathon took to the streets for their 13.1-mile tour of Philadelphia.

Nearly 10,000 participants took off from the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and made their way through Center City to a loop along the Schuylkill River on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and back to the finish at the Art Museum.

Bill Ling of Clementon, NJ dominated the race. Leading at the half, he was able to maintain the lead and win with a pace of 1:14:19. Read more about Ling here.

POSTED: Saturday, March 29, 2014, 5:00 AM
Filed Under: Running
Love Run race logo

This Sunday, March 30 marks the 1st annual Philadelphia Love Run. Several local streets will be closed or detoured throughout the city in connection with the race. Delays can be expected.

Motorists are advised to use alternate routes, avoid areas along the race course, allow for extra driving time and proceed with extreme caution during the race.

Some of the major areas impacted include:

  • The Benjamin Franklin Parkway: The inner drives of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway will be closed from 7:45 am - approximately 9:00 am. On Sunday, the vicinity near 20th Street and the Parkway will be closed and the Logan Circle area restricted to vehicular traffic. Parking in the Philadelphia Museum of Art area is very limited.
  • Citywide along the 13.1-mile route of the Love Run route
POSTED: Thursday, March 27, 2014, 5:00 AM
Filed Under: Heather Moore | Running

With the weather breaking and the Broad Street Run approaching, people are going to begin hitting the pavement after a long winter indoors. Many people will begin ramping up their mileage and some people will start noticing pain. When do we need to pay attention to the pain? When do we just run through it? 

One of the biggest mistakes runners make—and the reason my clinic is full of patients—is that people’s first response to pain is to stop running. Many people will feel pain and the pain will increase and as the pain increases the first thought is to stop running. The thought is that by stopping, the pain will disappear.  However, by just stopping running and not treating it, the pain will not go away. For the first couple days or weeks the pain may lessen because the inflammation will go down, but you will not have fixed the problem. 

Below are listed some common running injuries and some ways to treat them initially. Ignoring them is not the answer. They need to be addressed as the pain is felt. It needs to be stated that if you feel pain it is best to have that pain diagnosed by a medical professional so that the most proper plan of action can be put into place. 

  • Shin splints: Shin splints are pain felt up the shin. Shin splints are commonly felt by runners as distances increase. There are many fads on the internet to treat shin splints and every runner will offer you his/her own take on what they have experienced or feel is the fool-proof method for treating shin splints. 


POSTED: Wednesday, March 26, 2014, 5:30 AM
Jon Darling, athletic trainer for North Fargo, N.D. Spartan High School, tapes senior Marlee Nasset's ankle prior to track practice, Friday, May 14, 2004. (AP Photo/Alyssa Hurst)

While watching our favorite sports teams, we are generally hoping for 2 things—a win for our team and no injuries.

Injuries have always been a part of sports and likely always will be. The difference between a championship season and missing the playoffs may be 1-2 injuries. Fortunately, professional and college teams almost always have an athletic trainer on site to care for that injury.

Athletic trainers (ATs) are nationally certified after passing a board exam and obtaining a bachelor’s or master’s degree in athletic training. They are state-licensed and work under the direction of a physician in most states. The services provided by ATs comprise prevention, emergency care, clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions.1 ATs are the first medical providers to respond to an on field emergency. They care for the individual player (often alone), until an ambulance arrives to transport the player to a hospital.

POSTED: Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 5:30 AM
Runners take off from the starting line during the 32nd running of the Blue Cross Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, Pa., on May 1, 2011. (David Maialetti/Staff Photographer)

Hey guys, did you know we’re only 40 days away from racing down Broad Street? I bet it seemed so far away when you heard you were one of the 40,000 lucky runners to get a bib in this year’s lottery — and yet here we are, with only a little more than a month left to train. While you head into your final push, here’s five important, but oftentimes over-looked, tips to keep in mind for the 35th Annual Broad Street Run:

Vary your run. Even a beginner's body will become accustomed to a daily running routine. “Your body responds most strongly to unfamiliar stimuli, and after prolonged repetition even the toughest workouts suffer from the law of diminishing returns,” says Alex Hutchinson of Runner’s World. Try to vary something about your run every day — whether its distance, speed, or hills, your body will thank you come race day.

Taper your mileage. In the weeks leading up to Broad Street, Julie Coté of Magee Rehabilitation Hospital recommends tapering your mileage so you don’t race fatigued. “In fact, you should plan to complete your longest training run two weeks before the big day,” says Coté. Running extra miles the week of the race will just leave you tired and more prone to injury.

POSTED: Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 5:30 AM
(iStockphoto)

One pound of mashed potatoes weighs the same as one pound of raw potatoes. No matter how you slice, scallop or roast it, a pound is a pound.

So why do the weight-watching women of the world preach the misinformed belief that lean muscle weighs more than fat? I find most individuals use this erroneous rationale to soften the blow of the scale. When the numbers on the scale begin to tip in an unfavorable direction, it is easy to find comfort in the theory that muscle weighs more than fat—especially if you are resistance training.

While fat and lean muscle weighs the same pound for pound, their composition varies immensely. Muscle has a leaner appearance due to its high density, whereas free-floating, Jello-like, fatty tissue needs more space to jiggle around, due to its low volume. Hence, someone with a high body-fat percentage will look overweight in comparison to an individual with a high lean tissue percentage.

POSTED: Monday, March 24, 2014, 9:40 AM
Team West pitcher Jazmine Ayala in action Wednesday. Team Southeast from McLean, Virginia was defeated 9-0 by Team West from Tucson, Ariz., in the 2013 Little League World Series Championship game Wednesday night Aug. 14, 2013 in Portland. (AP Photo/The Oregonian, Ross William Hamilton)

Baseball and softball may be similar sports, but the injury data differs quite a bit. Let’s see what the research says.

Injury statistics

A 2007 paper in the Journal of Athletic Training looked at softball injuries from 1988-2004 using the NCAA injury surveillance system. Over the 16 years of data collection, the rate of injury was 1.6 times higher in games than in practices (4.3 versus 2.7 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures).

  • Preseason injury rates were more than double the regular season injury rates.
  • Postseason injury rates were lower than preseason and in-season rates.
  • 43% of injuries occurred to the lower extremity while 33% were to the upper extremity.  
  • For game injuries, ankle sprains and knee internal derangements accounted for 19% of all injuries.
  • Concussions accounted for 6% of all game injuries and players were 3 times more likely to sustain a concussion and 2 times more likely to suffer a knee internal derangement in a game versus practice.
POSTED: Friday, March 21, 2014, 5:03 PM
Filed Under: Baseball | In The News
The Phillies' Freddy Galvis. (Yong Kim/Staff Photographer)

Phillies shortstop Freddy Galvis was hospitalized with a staph infection in his leg early Friday morning. By the afternoon, one source reported the infection was being treated as MRSA.

Galvis will begin the season on the disabled list, but the more immediate concern is for his personal well-being—and that of other Phillies players, personnel and even opponents.

The best-known cases of MRSA outbreak in recent sports history involved NFL teams. The St. Louis Rams, Cleveland Browns and Tampa Bay Buccaneers have all experienced somewhat widespread outbreaks since 2003. Well-known players including All-Pro LeCharles Bentley and Kellen Winslow Jr. were affected.

About this blog

Whether you are a weekend warrior, an aging baby boomer, a student athlete or just someone who wants to stay active, this blog is for you. Read about our growing list of expert contributors here.

Robert Senior Sports Doc blog Editor
Alfred Atanda, Jr., M.D. Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children.
Robert Cabry, M.D. Drexel Sports Medicine, Team physician - U.S. Figure Skating, Assoc. Team Physician - Drexel
Brian Cammarota, MEd, ATC, CSCS, CES Symetrix Sports Performance, athletic trainer at OAA Orthopaedics
Desirea D. Caucci, PT, DPT, OCS Co-owner of Conshohocken Physical Therapy, Board Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist
Michael G. Ciccotti, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician for the Phillies & St. Joe's
Julie Coté, PT, MPT, OCS, COMT Magee Rehabilitation Hospital
Peter F. DeLuca, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician - Eagles, Head Orthopedic Surgeon - Flyers
Joel H. Fish, Ph.D. Director - The Center For Sport Psychology, Sports Psychology Consultant - 76ers & Flyers
R. Robert Franks, D.O. Rothman Institute, Team Physician - USA Wrestling, Consultant - Philadelphia Phillies
Ashley B. Greenblatt, ACE-CPT Certified Personal Trainer at The Sporting Club at The Bellevue
Cassie Haynes, JD, MPH Co-Founder, Trap Door Athletics, CrossFit LI Certified
Eugene Hong, MD, CAQSM, FAAFP Team Physician - Drexel, Philadelphia University, Saint Joe’s, & U.S. National Women’s Lacrosse
Jim McCrossin, ATC Flyers and Phantoms
Kevin Miller Fitness Coach, Philadelphia Union
Heather Moore, PT, DPT, CKTP Owner of Total Performance Physical Therapy, North Wales, Pa.
David Rubenstein, M.D. Main Line Health Lankenau Medical Center, Team Orthopedist - Philadelphia 76ers
Justin Shaginaw, MPT, ATC Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute, Athletic Trainer - US Soccer Federation
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