Wednesday, April 23, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

POSTED: Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 5:30 AM
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Did you know that up to 91 percent of competitive swimmers have reported experiencing shoulder pain? Unfortunately most young swimmers will develop such pain—it’s just part of the sport.The same used to be true of youth pitchers in baseball.

For years, there was growing evidence that youth baseball pitchers were experiencing a high number of shoulder and elbow injuries. These injuries appeared related to excessive exposure to throwing the baseball. It was an epidemic, a talented 13-year old kid’s future ended due to shoulder and/or elbow ligamentous injuries. It got to a point where these kids and their parents were coming to orthopaedic surgeons for the elbow-saving Tommy John surgical procedure. Enough was enough.

In the beginning of 2007, Little League baseball became the first organization to implement a pitch count rule to protect young pitching arms. This is an age-based system in which a pitcher who throws a certain number of pitches must wait several days before competitively throwing again. Even Major League Baseball managers follow pitch counts to protect multi-million dollar shoulders from injury.


Good Shepherd Penn Partners - Shoulder and Trunk Exercises for Swimmers from Good Shepherd Penn Partners on Vimeo.

POSTED: Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 5:00 AM
Filed Under: Heather Moore
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Since the article Is sitting the new smoking? was posted I have had a lot of inquiries about whether or not a standing desk is the way to go and if it is, which desk is the most appropriate for correct standing posture at your workstation? This is a very complicated question. While the answer may be that a standing desk is the better way to go, there are some things that need to be clarified before you dive full force into standing eight hours a day. 

The goal for anyone with a sedentary job is to get up and move. Finding ways to do that—whether it be standing and pacing during conference calls or just standing up and walking around your desk chair—is something that everyone should try to incorporate into their work day. A standing desk may be the answer, but it may also cause problems. 

Do not try to go from a completely sedentary position to standing for an 8-hour day; you will most likely develop back pain or leg pain, become frustrated and go back to sitting. The best way to implement a standing work station is to utilize both a standing and a sitting workstation so when it is appropriate you are able to shift from standing to sitting. Don’t forget, most people blame excessive amount of sitting on their jobs but fail to get up and move when they get home. When you get home, plan to be up and moving for most of the evening, not sitting down and watching TV or working on the computer. Keep moving as long as you can at night. Make sure you are finding every opportunity not to sit. 

POSTED: Monday, April 21, 2014, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: We Tried It | Working Out

The disclaimer is there: This class is not for the faint of heart.

“I really think it’s important to have a solid base of strength fitness under your belt,” Michele Rogers, resident muscle mechanic at Relentless Fitness, said of her ‘H.I.I.T. It Hard’ ­ high intensity interval training class.

After running eight miles on Kelly Drive Saturday, and playing hours of full court basketball Sunday, I thought I at least had the stamina to withstand an hour of this high intensity workout. But on a rainy Tuesday night inside the cozy boutique fitness studio in Washington Square, I found myself more drenched than if I had stood outside.

POSTED: Thursday, April 17, 2014, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: Ashley Greenblatt | Men | Women | Working Out
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Does your current exercise routine have you running in circles? When it comes to keeping pace with exercise adherence and motivation, employing a Personal Trainer can help reach one’s stride. However, determining which Personal Trainer to choose can be a challenging task, and it is important to be aware of which credentials to look for and what differentiates one trainer from the next.

This is your body we are talking about. Would you go to just any doctor your insurance covers without reading up on the physician? Probably not. So why entrust the wellness of your body to any Joey Jockstrap your gym throws your way? I am here to help navigate you through what credentials and certifications to look for in a Personal Trainer. Let’s get to work.

Disqualify the Uncertified. As a rule of thumb, always verify that your Personal Trainer is certified.

POSTED: Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: Knee Injuries
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We all hear how ACL injuries are season-ending for professional athletes. But what if an athlete could return to sports without ACL surgery? 

There have been many articles showing that patients can return to activity, including sports, without ACL reconstruction. A recent study by Hetsroni et al in the August 2013 journal of Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy showed that a quarter of recreational skiers with ACL injuries can be treated non-operatively. However, most people go on to have continued episodes of instability causing additional injury if they return to sporting activities without surgery. So what are the risks of playing without an ACL and how do we know who can and can’t play without surgery?

The ACL is the main stabilizing ligament in the knee.  It prevents excessive rotation of the knee joint that can occur with cutting and pivoting motions such as those in football, soccer, basketball and other similar sports. When the ACL doesn’t work, these rotational forces are transmitted to the other knee structures resulting in tearing of the meniscus and damage to the joint surface cartilage. Cartilage is the Holy Grail of orthopaedics and sports medicine.  We do a very good job a reconstructing the ACL but our results with cartilage repair are adequate at best. 

POSTED: Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 5:30 AM
Filed Under: Broad Street Run | Running
Runners enter the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia finishing the Broad Street Run on Sunday, May 5, 2013. (Yong Kim / Staff Photographer)

Einstein Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Minn Saing is the Medical Director for the Blue Cross Broad Street Run. He offers these tips to keep you in top form:

Recognize Risk. Runners are most vulnerable to injury at certain times during their running careers.

  • Upon Initial Running – First 4-6 months
  • When returning to running after injury
  • When running longer distances
  • When running faster

Fixable Problems. Most running injuries are caused by recurrent issues that are often identifiable and preventable by the runner making some small changes.

POSTED: Monday, April 14, 2014, 10:02 AM
Filed Under: Broad Street Run | Running
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The return of warm weather means the opportunity to run outdoors while training for the Blue Cross Broad Street Run. Unfortunately, sun exposure can lead to progressive skin damage that leads to cancer. 

To help keep you protected during your running and training, Einstein Healthcare Network dermatologist Dr. Jonathon Wolfe at Einstein Medical Center Montgomery has provided the following tips and recommendations:

You need to wear sunscreen if you are going to spend a lot of time running outdoors. Sunscreen protects your skin by absorbing or reflecting the sun's rays. 

POSTED: Friday, April 11, 2014, 10:48 AM
Filed Under: In The News | Running

The annual Stroehmann 5K Walk+Run Against Hunger takes place tomorrow morning at 8 a.m. sharp, starting from the steps of the Philadelphia Art Museum.

Last year’s event attracted over 4,000 participants and raised almost $250,000 for area organizations including the Coalition Against Hunger, SHARE, The Food Trust and Philabundance. The event has been a spring tradition in Philadelphia since 1996.

After the start of the run, the opening ceremonies commence at 8:30 a.m.—when many runners should be crossing the finish line. Speakers will include executive from Stroehmann bakeries and Acme Markets, as well as an active Philadelphia Eagles player (the player’s name was not available as of today.)

About this blog

Whether you are a weekend warrior, an aging baby boomer, a student athlete or just someone who wants to stay active, this blog is for you. Read about our growing list of expert contributors here.

Robert Senior Sports Doc blog Editor
Alfred Atanda, Jr., M.D. Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children.
Robert Cabry, M.D. Drexel Sports Medicine, Team physician - U.S. Figure Skating, Assoc. Team Physician - Drexel
Brian Cammarota, MEd, ATC, CSCS, CES Symetrix Sports Performance, athletic trainer at OAA Orthopaedics
Desirea D. Caucci, PT, DPT, OCS Co-owner of Conshohocken Physical Therapy, Board Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist
Michael G. Ciccotti, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician for the Phillies & St. Joe's
Julie Coté, PT, MPT, OCS, COMT Magee Rehabilitation Hospital
Peter F. DeLuca, M.D. Rothman Institute, Head Team Physician - Eagles, Head Orthopedic Surgeon - Flyers
Joel H. Fish, Ph.D. Director - The Center For Sport Psychology, Sports Psychology Consultant - 76ers & Flyers
R. Robert Franks, D.O. Rothman Institute, Team Physician - USA Wrestling, Consultant - Philadelphia Phillies
Ashley B. Greenblatt, ACE-CPT Certified Personal Trainer at The Sporting Club at The Bellevue
Cassie Haynes, JD, MPH Co-Founder, Trap Door Athletics, CrossFit LI Certified
Eugene Hong, MD, CAQSM, FAAFP Team Physician - Drexel, Philadelphia University, Saint Joe’s, & U.S. National Women’s Lacrosse
Jim McCrossin, ATC Flyers and Phantoms
Kevin Miller Fitness Coach, Philadelphia Union
Heather Moore, PT, DPT, CKTP Owner of Total Performance Physical Therapy, North Wales, Pa.
David Rubenstein, M.D. Main Line Health Lankenau Medical Center, Team Orthopedist - Philadelphia 76ers
Justin Shaginaw, MPT, ATC Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute, Athletic Trainer - US Soccer Federation
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