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Archive: May, 2013

Teaching about race and health

Friday, May 31, 2013, 6:30 AM
Today’s piece, the fourth in our ongoing race and health series, is by Janet Golden, a historian of medicine and public health. She writes about the teaching of race and health, and connections between past and present. - Michael Yudell As a medical historian, I find the subject of race and... Read more

A murder in Pakistan threatens polio eradication

Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 6:30 AM
A United Nations worker was gunned down by extremists near Peshawar, Pakistan, while delivering vaccines Tuesday in the village of Kaggawala. The World Health Organization, which runs the Global Polio Eradication Initiative for the U.N., then announced that it was temporarily suspending the program... Read more

Can flu cause mental illness?

Thursday, May 23, 2013, 6:30 AM
In a Psych. 101 class many years ago, I remember learning that some mental disorders were more common among people born in winter and spring. The reason was unclear. I pretty much forgot about this interesting factoid until reading about a recent study that found evidence of a link between some... Read more

The health of the African and Caribbean immigrant community

Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 6:30 AM
Today we have another important and interesting contribution to our ongoing series on race and health in Philadelphia. Oni Richards-Waritay, executive director of the African Family Health Organization (AFAHO) discusses how cultural and linguistic barriers can lead to poor health outcomes. -- Michael... Read more

Health disparities in Philadelphia’s Latino community

Friday, May 17, 2013, 6:30 AM
We continue our series on race and health in Philadelphia today, joined by Cynthia Figueroa, president and CEO of Congreso de Latinos Unidos, who shares her expert insight into the state of health in Philadelphia’s Latino community. - Michael Yudell Health disparities are differences in health... Read more

Are ‘alternative’ vaccine schedules safer?

Tuesday, May 14, 2013, 6:30 AM
Almost 50% of children have not received all the recommended vaccines at some point before their second birthday, according to a study of 300,000 children that was recently published in JAMA Pediatrics. While some cases of skipped vaccines may be due to missed opportunities or difficulty accessing... Read more

Wanted for Mother’s Day: paid time off

Thursday, May 9, 2013, 6:30 AM
Across the country this Mother’s Day 2013, moms will wake to pancakes and juice in bed and some assortment of cards, gifts and children sticky with syrup and ready (at least for an hour) to serve their mothers’ every need. Missing from this familiar tableau will be the “gift”... Read more

Am I racist?

Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 9:36 AM
According to an online test developed by Harvard psychologists, I have a moderate preference toward white people. I—a liberal white male who deeply cares about racial equity—was quicker to assign positive words (e.g., joy, love, peace) to faces of white people and negative words (e.g.... Read more

Race and health in Philadelphia

Wednesday, May 1, 2013, 6:30 AM
What does your race say about your health – or your health about your race? Quite a bit. In the coming weeks and months, contributors to The Public's Health from diverse backgrounds and different communities will be exploring the interconnections between the two, and more generally the lived... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH Research Director, Drexel Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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