Monday, July 14, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

The flu vaccine: A simple solution to a complicated problem

Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 6:00 AM
Many of us have suffered through the flu without tragic consequences. But it is important to remember that the virus can have catastrophic complications that can result in death - especially among vulnerable populations such as pregnant women, babies, young children, the elderly, immune-compromised... Read more

Changing the rules of PTSD

Wednesday, November 13, 2013, 6:00 AM
Last week, the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies had its annual meeting in Philadelphia. I was there, and discussions abound about “Criterion A.” Contrary to what its name might suggest, Criterion A is not a vitamin, nor is it a short-course bicycle race. Criterion A defines... Read more

Disasters: How we can help those in the Philippines and ourselves

Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 5:30 AM
The devastation in the Philippines following Typhoon Haiyan is enormous. Over 10,000 are dead. Survivors are without water, food, and shelter. Disease outbreaks have begun. International relief efforts are hampered by continuing storms and by devastating conditions. UNICEF estimates that up to... Read more

The cost of war: Polio rises again in Syria

Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 10:16 AM
The outbreak of polio in the Syrian Arab Republic announced by the World Health Organization a few weeks ago is a troubling reminder that global conflicts threaten the public’s health. Violence, like the 2-1/2-year-old civil war in Syria, can lead to significant disruption and/or long term damage... Read more

Lead and the Philadelphia Tooth Fairy Project

Monday, November 4, 2013, 6:30 AM
For much of the 20th century, America was plagued by a terrible lead poisoning epidemic that sent children into comas, convulsions, and even death. Lead paint covered the walls of homes throughout the nation, especially in the old, industrial cities, and poisoned hundreds of thousands of children.... Read more

Spicing up your spices with rodent hairs and Salmonella

Friday, November 1, 2013, 6:30 AM
Just when you thought our food supply was safe again. In the wake of the government shutdown that suspended many of the essential protective services of the Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (we wrote about this a few weeks back), an FDA report – released... Read more

Meatless Mondays . . . in the land of the Philly Cheesesteak?

Wednesday, October 30, 2013, 12:19 PM
“Tempeh Whiz wit'!” “Vegan cheesesteak!’’ Will these words soon be part of the cacophony of sizzling onion and clanking steel that echoes between Pat’s and Geno’s? Probably not, but recent activity in Philadelphia’s City Council indicates that this may... Read more

Watch where your raw oysters come from

Monday, October 28, 2013, 6:30 AM
With a squeeze of lemon and a dash of hot sauce, raw oysters are a winter delicacy. Unfortunately, a recent letter in the New England Journal of Medicine warns, strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus are contaminating some of them harvested from parts of the Atlantic Ocean. What is Vibrio parahaemolyticus? Vibrio... Read more

Concerned about food and drug safety now? Look back aways . . .

Monday, October 21, 2013, 6:30 AM
The recent government shutdown brought a halt to most of the work of two agencies overseeing food safety. (Meat and poultry inspection continued under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Agriculture). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), part of the Department of Health and Human Services, is... Read more

'A.C.O.D.': public health menace and/or hilarious movie?

Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:50 PM
“Against the assault of laughter,” Mark Twain once wrote, “nothing can stand.” Not even a bad divorce is safe from that assault, as you’ll quickly learn if you go see the new film A.C.O.D. (Adult Children of Divorce), opening this weekend in Philadelphia. As your resident... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH Research Director, Drexel Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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