Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Conquering polio: Past, present ... and future

Monday, May 5, 2014, 8:21 PM
Sixty years ago, a field test of what would become the first polio vaccine got under way in the United States, enrolling 1.8 million children in the largest clinical trial in history. Over 600,000 young volunteers received injections of the brand new Salk vaccine... Read more

Tonight Only: An Evening of Discussion With The Public’s Health

Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 9:14 AM
The Philadelphia Science Festival continues today, and events around the city include a science happy hour at The Continental in Old City and science night at the Phillies game. But if public health is your game, head over to Rembrandt’s Restaurant in Fairmount tonight for an evening with The... Read more

The air pollution racial gap: Pa. and N.J. among the worst

Friday, April 25, 2014, 6:30 AM
Breathing. It is easy for most of us, but not for the 25 million Americans with asthma. Being black or Hispanic, poor, and young are among the risk factors for asthma. African Americans were three times as likely to die of asthma-related causes in 2009 as whites. Research reported recently in PLOS... Read more

Without regulation, e-cigarette liquid is used for . . . eye drops

Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 6:30 AM
Here’s a quick quiz: what do the following have in common?: Pink Bubble Gum, Peanut Butter Cup, Strawberry Shortcake, Gummi Bear, Mountain Dew Burst and Banana Split Dreams? Are they (A) an assortment of candy, gum and soda given out at children’s birthday parties; (B) names of soaps, shampoos... Read more

Government-sponsored health care's success (in World War II)

Monday, April 21, 2014, 6:30 AM
In 1943, the United States government began paying for medical, nursing, and hospital maternity and infant care provided to the wives of enlisted men in the lowest four military pay grades. The Emergency Maternity and Infant Care Act, known as EMIC, funded the care of about 1-1/2 million women and infants... Read more

Book Review: Microbes that have gone missing

Friday, April 18, 2014, 6:30 AM
Just in case you were looking to add one more item to your list of Ways Humanity Threatens Itself, you’ll want to dive right into Martin J. Blaser’s Missing Microbes, out this month from Henry Holt and Co. As if it were not enough that overuse of antibiotics increases resistance to potentially... Read more

Visualizing Philadelphia's public health nurses at work: A century of photos

Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 6:30 AM
For more than a century, nurses have served as the cornerstone of public health efforts in this country. Most Americans at some point in their lives have had contact with a public health nurse. It’s hard to live for very long without meeting one. Remember the school nurse who made sure your vaccinations... Read more

C-sections and baseball: Not a good mix

Friday, April 11, 2014, 6:30 AM
Last week the blogosphere was set on fire when former NFL quarterback and current WFAN commentator Boomer Esiason commented on the paternity leave of New York Mets' second baseman Daniel Murphy, who missed two games, including opening day, to be with his wife while she delivered their baby. “Quite... Read more

Death certificates: classifying the dead to save the living

Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 6:30 AM
Why do we die? The question is existential, scientific, and spiritual at the very least. It’s also bureaucratic. Like voter registration cards and driver’s licenses, death certificates relegate the cause of our physical demise to a discrete category that becomes a single data point in... Read more

Addiction: Recovering Main Street

Monday, April 7, 2014, 12:00 PM
Dramatic increases in overdose rates now terrorize rural and suburban neighborhoods. Inner cities have long dealt with the quiet desperations of addiction, but now these new communities also are overrun. This clashes with our stereotypes of misuse and addiction. My point isn't to criticize very... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH Research Director, Drexel Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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