Sunday, November 29, 2015


A vaccine against the epidemic of mass imprisonment

Tuesday, November 10, 2015, 6:30 AM
A powerful group of United States senators unveiled a bill last month designed to reform federal criminal sentencing laws. If passed, the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2015 will begin to address some of the most troubling areas of federal criminal sentencing – the cause, many experts... Read more

Maternal mortality: A problem with solutions

Thursday, June 18, 2015, 6:30 AM
Rates of maternal mortality (deaths within one year of the end of a pregnancy) are too high in the United States and too high in Philadelphia. There are solutions to this problem. That is the conclusion of an investigative report issued last month by the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. A... Read more

Proposed 1920s orphanage study just one example in history of scientific racism

Tuesday, March 3, 2015, 5:00 AM
In the late 1920s, scientists hatched an outrageous plan to settle a question at the heart of American racial thought: were differences between racial groups driven by environment or by heredity? In other words, was the racist social order of the time – white over black — an inevitable and... Read more

The Diabetes Blues

Tuesday, January 13, 2015, 6:30 AM
Lord, I’m sick an’ down Can’t tell my head from my feet Lord, I’m sick an’ down Can’t hardly tell my head from my feet Well, I got the sugar diabetes Somebody please. Lord have mercy on me. When Delta Blues guitarist and singer Big Joe Williams sang... Read more

Ferguson: A tale of health disparities

Wednesday, December 10, 2014, 5:30 AM
This post is part of an exchange between The Public's Health and the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. With the recent grand jury decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown... Read more

A century after W.E.B. Du Bois, science still gets race wrong

Friday, October 3, 2014, 6:30 AM
Most of us today don’t know the name W.E.B. Du Bois. But we should. Du Bois’s pioneering sociological work on race (books like The Philadelphia Negro and The Souls of Black Folk) and his leadership at the forefront of civil rights struggles (including a founder of the National Association... Read more

The link between felon disenfranchisement, politics, and health

Wednesday, June 11, 2014, 6:30 AM
Consider two things: - Life expectancy at birth for an African American male born in Philadelphia is 7.6 years shorter than a white male (67.5 years vs. 75.1). - About 13% of African American men in the United States are prohibited from voting compared to 2.5% of the general voting age... Read more

The air pollution racial gap: Pa. and N.J. among the worst

Friday, April 25, 2014, 6:30 AM
Breathing. It is easy for most of us, but not for the 25 million Americans with asthma. Being black or Hispanic, poor, and young are among the risk factors for asthma. African Americans were three times as likely to die of asthma-related causes in 2009 as whites. Research reported recently in PLOS... Read more

Why are our kids still dying in car crashes?

Thursday, February 20, 2014, 6:30 AM
People who work in public health often see the glass as half empty. Troubling health reports remind us where public health strategies have failed to take hold to prevent lost lives or injuries. Grim health statistics often underscore the number of people living with diseases that could have been prevented... Read more

Civil Rights movement's often-overlooked impact on health care

Tuesday, August 27, 2013, 9:49 AM
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on Aug. 28, 1963, remembered primarily for the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s “I Have a Dream” speech, was part of an era that forced the nation to become more fully aware of racial discrimination – including discrimination in health care... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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