Saturday, May 30, 2015

Michael Yudell

Jeb Bush clowns around on climate change

Thursday, May 21, 2015, 6:43 PM
The GOP anti-climate change clown car dropped Gov. Jeb Bush off at a New Hampshire house party Wednesday, where the yet-to-announce 2016 presidential candidate took umbrage with those who claim there is consensus about man-made climate change. “For the people to say the science is decided on... Read more

Proposed 1920s orphanage study just one example in history of scientific racism

Tuesday, March 3, 2015, 5:00 AM
In the late 1920s, scientists hatched an outrageous plan to settle a question at the heart of American racial thought: were differences between racial groups driven by environment or by heredity? In other words, was the racist social order of the time – white over black — an inevitable and... Read more

Seeking common ground in very different views of mental illness

Friday, February 27, 2015, 10:21 AM
A trio of ethicists from the University of Pennsylvania sparked some controversy last month by publishing an essay that was provocatively headlined “Improving Long-term Psychiatric Care: Bring Back the Asylum.” The authors–Dominic Sisti, Andrea Segal, and Ezekiel Emanuel– are... Read more

Chris Christie, vaccinologist? Measles expert?

Friday, February 6, 2015, 6:30 AM
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is rightfully taking a drubbing this week for his comments about the measles vaccine and his claim that parents "need to have some measure of choice" about vaccinating their children. In the midst of what threatens to be the worst year for measles in the United States... Read more

Why Surgeon General’s confirmation is a good thing

Tuesday, January 20, 2015, 6:30 AM
Dr. Vivek Murthy, who during his more-than-year-long-nomination process faced blistering criticism for his position linking gun violence and public health, was finally confirmed last month as the 19th Surgeon General of the United States. Dr. Murthy’s nomination had languished, in large part,... Read more

Syracuse University can teach us a lot about Ebola panic

Friday, October 17, 2014, 5:45 PM
Shame on Syracuse University for proving a point—that panic and bad behavior in the wake of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa threatens us as well. The Washington Post reported Friday that Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Michel du Cille was disinvited by Syracuse to a journalism workshop... Read more

A century after W.E.B. Du Bois, science still gets race wrong

Friday, October 3, 2014, 6:30 AM
Most of us today don’t know the name W.E.B. Du Bois. But we should. Du Bois’s pioneering sociological work on race (books like The Philadelphia Negro and The Souls of Black Folk) and his leadership at the forefront of civil rights struggles (including a founder of the National Association... Read more

Ben Franklin’s Treatise on Wind

Thursday, August 21, 2014, 6:00 AM
Benjamin Franklin was a man for the ages. His story is a familiar one. Born in Boston in 1706. The youngest of 17 children. Moved to Philadelphia in 1723. He gained fame for his experiments with electricity, and was a philosopher, diplomat, inventor, and scientist. He also was a specialist in another... Read more

A conversation about Robin Williams, Parkinson’s, and depression

Friday, August 15, 2014, 6:30 AM
Like anyone with a funny bone, my heart is heavy at the loss of Robin Williams. I had the privilege of twice seeing him perform live, including a surprise set at the Comedy Cellar in New York. His comedy–pulled from his own, often difficult, life experiences–took his audiences to great heights... Read more

The victims of war

Wednesday, July 23, 2014, 6:30 AM
While havoc spreads across the Middle East—in Iraq, Syria, Israel, and Gaza—it is civilians who are bearing the brunt of newly surfaced and long-standing disputes. This week in the news—the escalating war between Israel and Hamas. Last week—the crumbling of Iraq as ISIS fighters... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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