Friday, July 25, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Jonathan Purtle

Grilling tip: Watch for wire brush bristles in your hot dog

Thursday, July 3, 2014, 12:49 AM
With the Fourth of July come fireworks, crowds on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and The Public’s Health's annual post about the dangers of ingesting wire bristles hot off the grill. Although we hate to cast a pall of threat over the holiday weekend, we figure its best to share information that... Read more

Can you describe the symptoms of PTSD?

Friday, June 27, 2014, 6:30 AM
June 27 is National Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Awareness Day. And yes, it is part of PTSD awareness month. But as Dr. Matthew Friedman, executive director of the National Center for PTSD, wrote in a recent blog post, well-intentioned efforts to raise awareness about PTSD often tell an incomplete... Read more

What are 'adverse childhood experiences'? Ask Philadelphia residents

Friday, June 20, 2014, 6:30 AM
We’ve written a lot about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study and the health risks that arise when children experience toxic stress. The original ACE study was conducted with a predominantly white, middle-class population of adults in California and found a strong relationship between... Read more

The link between felon disenfranchisement, politics, and health

Wednesday, June 11, 2014, 6:30 AM
Consider two things: - Life expectancy at birth for an African American male born in Philadelphia is 7.6 years shorter than a white male (67.5 years vs. 75.1). - About 13% of African American men in the United States are prohibited from voting compared to 2.5% of the general voting age... Read more

Death certificates: classifying the dead to save the living

Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 6:30 AM
Why do we die? The question is existential, scientific, and spiritual at the very least. It’s also bureaucratic. Like voter registration cards and driver’s licenses, death certificates relegate the cause of our physical demise to a discrete category that becomes a single data point in... Read more

Philadelphia: brotherly love and trauma-informed practice

Friday, March 21, 2014, 6:30 AM
First in a series of posts about what is being done to address trauma and toxic stress in the city. Four years ago, on a train from Philadelphia to Washington, Sandra Bloom told me about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. I hadn’t heard of it, and was astounded to learn about strong... Read more

What common trauma injury isn't treated at trauma centers? PTSD

Thursday, March 6, 2014, 6:30 AM
It’s not just military veterans who develop post-traumatic stress disorder. As described in a previous post, what’s known today as PTSD has been observed in people who experienced traumatic events for centuries if not millennia. One relatively common event that can cause PTSD is a serious... Read more

If vodka doesn't kill the Russians, anti-gay bias might

Friday, February 14, 2014, 6:30 AM
The Olympics have brought attention and scrutiny to Russia’s policies on homosexuality for infringing upon the human rights of its citizens and visitors. But could the the country's position on gays and lesbians also pose a hazard to the health of its citizens? As we’ve written about in... Read more

The 'Drunkometer' and its descendants: Tools of public health

Monday, February 3, 2014, 5:30 AM
A law is only as good as the ability to enforce it. Drunk driving is major cause of disability and premature mortality in the U.S., with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimating that alcohol-impaired driving is responsible for about 10,000 deaths annually. For this reason, driving... Read more

How long can your baby expect to live?

Friday, January 17, 2014, 6:30 AM
By mid-January, a pile of “Year in Review” magazines has accumulated beneath my coffee table. These dog-eared retrospectives all contain stories of a similar sort: famous people who died in 2013. The close of the calendar is a fitting time to reflect on icons who have departed, but what... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH Research Director, Drexel Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
Also on Philly.com:
Stay Connected