Tuesday, September 2, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Infectious disease

Conquering polio: Past, present ... and future

Monday, May 5, 2014, 8:21 PM
Sixty years ago, a field test of what would become the first polio vaccine got under way in the United States, enrolling 1.8 million children in the largest clinical trial in history. Over 600,000 young volunteers received injections of the brand new Salk vaccine... Read more

Book Review: Microbes that have gone missing

Friday, April 18, 2014, 6:30 AM
Just in case you were looking to add one more item to your list of Ways Humanity Threatens Itself, you’ll want to dive right into Martin J. Blaser’s Missing Microbes, out this month from Henry Holt and Co. As if it were not enough that overuse of antibiotics increases resistance to potentially... Read more

London bodies solve mystery of Black Death

Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 6:30 AM
On television, forensic scientists can solve the mystery of someone’s death in an hour. In reality, uncovering the facts can take a lot longer. As an anthropologist leading the investigation of some skeletons dug up in England last year put it: their discovery “solves a 660-year-old mystery... Read more

Mike Huckabee, the male libido, and a history lesson

Thursday, January 30, 2014, 6:30 AM
Thanks to Fox News host and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, we get to revisit the public health lessons of the First and Second World Wars. In a recent address to the Republican National Committee, Huckabee excoriated Democrats for making women believe they were “helpless without Uncle Sugar... Read more

Public health movie stocking stuffers

Tuesday, December 10, 2013, 6:30 AM
If you are looking for two great public health movies to snuggle up with your family on the couch or to buy for your woefully public-health-history-ignorant friends this holiday season I have two recommendations: Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet, a Hollywood biopic made in 1940 starring Edward G. Robinson... Read more

Looking ahead to World AIDS Day 2014, and beyond

Tuesday, December 3, 2013, 6:30 AM
With Sunday's World AIDS Day, behind us, today is as good a day as any to think about the future and to embrace the World Bank’s “Development Goal 6”: “to halt by 2015 and begin to reverse the spread of HIV and AIDS, through prevention, care, treatment and mitigation services... Read more

The cost of war: Polio rises again in Syria

Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 10:16 AM
The outbreak of polio in the Syrian Arab Republic announced by the World Health Organization a few weeks ago is a troubling reminder that global conflicts threaten the public’s health. Violence, like the 2-1/2-year-old civil war in Syria, can lead to significant disruption and/or long term damage... Read more

Spicing up your spices with rodent hairs and Salmonella

Friday, November 1, 2013, 6:30 AM
Just when you thought our food supply was safe again. In the wake of the government shutdown that suspended many of the essential protective services of the Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (we wrote about this a few weeks back), an FDA report – released... Read more

Watch where your raw oysters come from

Monday, October 28, 2013, 6:30 AM
With a squeeze of lemon and a dash of hot sauce, raw oysters are a winter delicacy. Unfortunately, a recent letter in the New England Journal of Medicine warns, strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus are contaminating some of them harvested from parts of the Atlantic Ocean. What is Vibrio parahaemolyticus? Vibrio... Read more

'A.C.O.D.': public health menace and/or hilarious movie?

Thursday, October 17, 2013, 11:50 PM
“Against the assault of laughter,” Mark Twain once wrote, “nothing can stand.” Not even a bad divorce is safe from that assault, as you’ll quickly learn if you go see the new film A.C.O.D. (Adult Children of Divorce), opening this weekend in Philadelphia. As your resident... Read more
About this blog

What is public health — and why does it matter?

Through prevention, education, and intervention, public health practitioners - epidemiologists, health policy experts, municipal workers, environmental health scientists - work to keep us healthy.

It’s not always easy. Michael Yudell, Jonathan Purtle, and other contributors tell you why.

Michael Yudell, PhD, MPH Associate Professor, Drexel University School of Public Health
Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MPH Research Director, Drexel Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice
Janet Golden, PhD Professor of history, Rutgers University-Camden
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